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The 6-Kingdoms of life

Science, Grade 5

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Study Guide The 6-Kingdoms of life Science, Grade 5

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THE SIX KINGDOMS OF LIFE Classifying Plants and Animals Scientists classify plants and animals according to the structures and characteristics of each organism. They compare and contrast organisms, and those with similar structures and characteristics are grouped together. The characteristics that scientists consider when classifying plants and animals are: how many cells in the organism if the cell(s) contains a nucleus how the organism obtains food how it moves. Lesson Checkpoint: Why do scientists classify organisms? Order of Classifications The order within the six Kingdom classification system is Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species. The Kingdom is the largest group of organisms, and Species is the smallest group of organisms. Lesson Checkpoint: Think of a fun way to memorize the correct order of classification: Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Kingdom: ANIMAL Number of cells: multicellular Have nucleus? yes How obtains food: have to find own food Movement: can move on own Example: bear Kingdom: PLANT Number of cells: multicellular Have nucleus? yes How obtains food: can make own food Example: rose Kingdom: FUNGI Number of cells: most are multicellular Have nucleus? yes How obtains food: have to find own food Example: mushroom Algae Mushroom Kingdom: PROTISTS Number of cells: most are one cell Have nucleus? yes How obtains food: some make their own, some have to get their own food Example: algae Kingdom: EUBACTERIA Number of cells: one Have nucleus? no How obtains food: some make their own/some have to get their own food Environment: everywhere: all around us © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Kingdom: ARCHAEBACTERIA Number of cells: one Have nucleus? no How obtains food: make their own food Environment: harsh: salty, hot even with no sunshine or oxygen Lesson Checkpoint: How do plants obtain food? So many animals… After being placed in the animal kingdom, animals are then placed into a phylum group. The chordata is a phylum that includes animals with backbones. A group of chordata is then divided into five classes depending on their features and characteristics. Those five classes are fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Amphibians are cold-blooded organisms with smooth skin. They go through drastic changes during their life cycle. Amphibians breathe with gills and lungs during their lifetime. An example of an amphibian is a frog. Reptiles are cold-blooded organisms that have scales covering their bodies. Most reptiles lay eggs. Reptiles use their lungs to breathe. An example of a reptile is a snake. Mammals are warm-blooded organisms that have body hair and produce milk for their young. They also breathe air with their lungs. An example of a mammal is a dog. Lesson Checkpoint: How do reptiles breathe? © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Invertebrates are classified into phyla based on their structure and characteristics, such as mollusks, annelids, cnidarians, arthropods, sponges, and echinoderms. Mollusks have soft bodies and most mollusks have shells. Snails and clams are types of mollusks. Annelids have segmented bodies. An example of an annelid is an earthworm. Cnidarians are organisms that have stinging cells. Examples of cnidarians are hydra, jelly fish, and sea anemones. Arthropods are the largest animal phylum. Arthropods have segmented bodies and jointed legs. Insects are included in the arthropod grouping. Lesson Checkpoint: What do all cnidarians have in common? © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Classification of Plants Now we can’t forget about plants. Four well-known plant phyla include flowering plants, mosses, ferns, and conifers. Flowering plants are vascular, produce seeds, and produce flowers (obviously by their name). Vascular means having tubes that carry water and food throughout the entire plant. Ferns are vascular, do not make seeds (they make spores instead to reproduce), and they do not flower. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Mosses do not flower, they do not produce seeds, and they are not vascular. Conifers do not flower, they reproduce using cones and seeds, and they are vascular. Conifers have needles instead of leaves, such as pine trees. Lesson Checkpoint: What does vascular mean? © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
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