Curriculum Resources
Take learning to the next level and transform the way you teach with a vast library of ready-to-use, standards-aligned, adaptable curriculum resources. The resources listed below are either available with an Online Learning Subscription which allows you to instruct, assess and track student performance or as individual hands-on classroom resources which can be purchased. Choose from Multimedia Lessons, Curriculum Mastery Games, Flip Charts, Visual Learning Guides, Flash Cards, Vocabulary Cards, and Curriculum Modules available on our online store. PREMIUM ONLINE LEARNING SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS
  • Select By Standard
  • BROWSE CURRICULUM
    • General Science
    • Life Science / Biology
    • Human Body
    • Earth Science
    • Physical Science
    • Chemistry
    • Math
    • Language Arts
    • Social Studies
 

Sound and light energy

Science, Grade 5

Back
 

Study Guide

Provides a quick overview of the topic selected!

Flash Cards

Practice and review the topic selected with illustrated flash cards!

Quiz

Assess students’ understanding of the topic selected!

Worksheets

Print illustrated worksheets!

Games

Engage students with interactive games.

Study Guide Sound and light energy Science, Grade 5

1
/
3
SOUND AND LIGHT ENERGY What Is Sound? Sound is a type of energy that travels in waves which are caused by vibrations. How Does Sound Travel? Sound needs something in which to travel. Sound can travel through solids, liquids, and gases. Sound travels through solids the fastest. Characteristics of Sound Vibrations: movements made rapidly back and forth. Sound Waves: an invisible transfer of sound energy as it travels away from the energy source. Wavelength: the distance between a point on one sound wave and a similar point on another sound wave. Pitch and Loudness: the highness or lowness of a sound. Frequency: The number of vibrations in a period of time is called the frequency of a vibration. The faster the vibration, the higher the frequency. Frequency is measured in Hertz (Hz). Volume: The loudness or quietness of a sound is its volume. The loudness of a sound can be measured in units called decibels. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Measurement Examples of Various Sounds a whisper = 10 decibels normal conversation = 60 decibels a train = 100 decibels rock concert = 110-140 decibels Reflection and Absorption: Reflection is when sound bounces off an object. An echo is a reflected sound. Absorption is when sound is taken in by an object. What is Light? Light is a form of energy that travels in waves. Reflection, Absorption, and Refraction Reflection occurs when light rays bounce off a surface back to your eyes, such as when you see your reflection in a mirror. Absorption is when an object takes in a light wave. Refraction is when light bends moving from one medium to another. Light and Color We can only see only the wavelengths and frequencies of the colors in the visible spectrum which include red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. On the visible spectrum, as you move from the colors on the right to the colors on the left, wavelength decreases and frequency increases. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Invisible Waves Most waves in the electromagnetic spectrum are invisible to our eyes. Xrays and waves in your microwave that cook your food are examples of electromagnetic waves. What is a concave lens? A concave lens is thinner in the middle than on its edges. We use a concave lens to make things look smaller. What is a convex lens? A convex lens is thicker in the middle than on its edges. We use a convex lens to make things look larger. A magnifying glass contains a convex lens. Transparent, Translucent and Opaque Materials A transparent material allows light to pass through clearly without any effects, such as a window. A translucent material allows light to pass through it, but it is not clear. Wax paper is translucent. An opaque material does not allow any light to pass through at all, such as a brick wall. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
© Copyright 2012-2018 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Notice * Terms of Use