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Vivid Language in Writing

English Language Arts, Grade 4

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Study Guide Vivid Language in Writing English Language Arts, Grade 4

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WRITING ELEMENTS Topic Sentence A topic sentence supports or develops the theme or main idea of a paragraph. A topic sentence is usually the first sentence in a paragraph. It gives the reader an idea of what the paragraph is about. Example: If a paragraph was written about how hard it is to learn to play the piano, the topic sentence of the paragraph could be: Learning to play the piano isn’t easy. Supporting Sentences Supporting sentences support the topic or main idea of the paragraph. Supporting sentences give more details about the topic or main idea of the paragraph. Example: If a topic sentence reads: Winter is my favorite season. Then a good supporting sentence would be: I love to ski and go sledding, which you can only do in the winter. Concluding Sentence A concluding sentence is usually the last sentence of a paragraph. This sentence summarizes what was talked about in the paragraph. A concluding sentence wraps up the main idea in the paragraph and may also lead readers into the next paragraph. Think of a paragraph as a sandwich: Top piece of bread = topic sentence Middle of sandwich = supporting sentences/details Bottom piece of bread = concluding sentence © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Transitional Words and Phrases Transition words include: next then after first finally last Transition phrases include: in the meantime at the same time in the beginning Using transition words and phrases helps you move from one step to the next when writing about a process or event that took place. Sequencing: Writing the Steps to a Process in Order When you write the steps to a process, the steps should be written in the correct order, or in the correct sequence. Writing the steps in the proper order is important to do when writing a recipe or directions. If you are writing the steps on how to make a pumpkin pie, you need to have the steps in the correct order so that the pumpkin pie will be made properly. Example: How to Make a Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich First, you take out two pieces of bread, a jar of peanut butter, jelly, and a knife. Then you spread the peanut butter on one piece of bread. Next, you spread jelly on the other piece of bread. Lastly, you put the pieces of bread together, so that the peanut butter and jelly touch. Enjoy your sandwich! Notice all the transition words are in bold print above. They help your reader know when directions for the next step begin. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
Try This! Write the directions on how to tie a shoe for your younger sibling or friend. Write the steps in order, so the person can complete the task of tying his or her shoe. If you write the steps out of order, the person who is following your directions will not be able to tie the shoe correctly. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Permission is granted for the purchaser to print copies for non-commercial educational purposes only. Visit us at www.NewPathLearning.com.
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