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Flip Charts

What are Ecosystems? Flip Chart Set

Science, Grade 3

 
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\|xiFDDIJy00663nzW Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com 34-3210 Charts Charts What are Ecosystems? What are Ecosystems? Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Student Activity Guide Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to summarize key concepts and assess their understanding. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of science curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the Activity Guide. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Environment Exploring Ecosystems Habitat & Niche Population & Community Parts of an Ecosystem How does an ecosystem work? Kinds of Ecosystems Energy in an Ecosystem Changes in Ecosystems Vocabulary
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4321 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Environment What is an Environment? How is the place where a fish lives different from a place where a bird lives? Each kind of living organism needs a certain environment to survive. An organism’s environment is everything around it. It is made up of all living and nonliving things in an area. water soil & nutrients animals plants climate microorganisms air Living & Nonliving Things The living things in an environment include plants, animals and microorganisms. Nonliving things include air, water, nutrients, soil and climate.
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4321 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Sort the living and nonliving things shown. Write living or nonliving below each image. Environment Some photos courtesy of USGS.
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4322 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Exploring Ecosystems What is an Ecosystem? Everything in nature is connected. An ecosystem is made of all living and nonliving things in an environment that interact with each other. An ecosystem may be as large as a pond or as small as the area under a log in the forest. tiny organisms algae oxy gen fish aquatic plants c a r b o n d io xid e Living and nonliving things interact and depend on each other. plants - living animals - living soil - nonliving
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4322 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Name some of the living and non-living things you see in this pond ecosystem. Exploring Ecosystems What are some ecosystems that you have been to? Describe one. _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Living things ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Nonliving things ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4323 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Habitat & Niche An Organism’s Habitat Every organism in an ecosystem has a niche and a habitat. A habitat is the place where an organism lives. It provides food, water and shelter for the organism to survive. An Organism’s Niche A niche is the role that an organism has in an ecosystem. For instance, racoons eat both plants and other animals, then they provide food for larger predators like coyotes. All organisms have a role in an ecosystem. Woodpeckers help control insect populations. Fungi decompose debris and add nutrients back to the soil. Dragonflies eat tiny insects and provide food for frogs, birds and fish. Chipmunks eat fruits and nuts and help spread seeds. Woodpeckers help control insect populations. Fungi decompose debris and add nutrients back to the soil. Dragonflies eat tiny insects and provide food for frogs, birds and fish. Chipmunks eat fruits and nuts and help spread seeds. Woodpeckers help control insect populations. Fungi decompose debris and add nutrients back to the soil. Dragonflies eat tiny insects and provide food for frogs, birds and fish. Chipmunks eat fruits and nuts and help spread seeds. food food water shelter
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4323 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Where do you think these organisms live? Match each organism to its habitat or home. Habitat & Niche Some photos courtesy of USFWS.
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4324 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Population & Community Population Ecosystems contain populations and communities. A group of living organisms of the same kind, living in the same place, makes up a population. An ecosystem may include many different populations. Community All of the populations work together and form a community. The community of living things interacts with the non-living world around it to form an ecosystem. deer population duck population frog population dragonfly population
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4324 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Match each organism to its population. Population & Community Some photos courtesy of USGS.
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4325 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Parts of an Ecosystem An ecosystem includes soil, atmosphere, heat and light from the Sun, water and living organisms. Soil provides nutrients for the plants. The atmosphere provides oxygen and carbon dioxide for both plants and animals. The Sun provides heat for plants and animals, and light for plants to make food. Water is part of all living organisms; without water there would be no life. Plants take in water, nutrients, and carbon dioxide from their environment. They use light from the Sun to make food. Animals eat plants to get energy. They drink water and breathe in oxygen to live. atmosphere water water oxygen nutrients carbon dioxide soil - nutrients soil - nutrients water oxygen carbon dioxide Sun - heat & light
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4325 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Use these terms to label the parts of the ecosystem: nutrients, water, atmosphere, plant, animal, sunlight Why are soil and sunshine important to plants? What else do plants need to grow? _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ What nonliving things do animals need from their environment? _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Parts of an Ecosystem
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4326 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. How does an Ecosystem work? Pond Ecosystem The living organisms in an ecosystem depend on other living organisms but also on nonliving things for survival. For example, in a pond ecosystem, the sunlight helps algae grow. Algae make oxygen for the fish and also provide food for tiny pond organisms. The fish eat the tiny pond organisms, use the oxygen, and give out carbon dioxide (CO 2) which plants need to grow. ox yg en food CO 2 sunlight algae tiny organisms fish fish aquatic plants
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4326 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Use these terms to label the parts of a pond ecosystem: dragonfly, frog, tadpoles, aquatic plants, fish, water, Sun, algae How does an Ecosystem work? Describe how these parts of a pond ecosystem interact. _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4327 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Kinds of Ecosystems There are many kinds of ecosystems. Each ecosystem has its own unique group of living and nonliving things. Examples of different kinds of ecosystems include wetlands, coral reefs, prairies and deserts. Many factors, such as climate, soil and type of water, determine the kinds of plants and animals that can live there. wetland prairie coral reef desert Deserts are hot and dry with little rainfall. The soil is nutrient-poor. Coral reefs are mounds formed in the ocean by tiny animals called “polyps.” They pr ovide habitat for tropical fish and other animals. Prairies have four seasons, with a wide variety of temperatures and precipitation. The soil is nutrient-rich. Wetlands are covered with water most of the year and provide habitat for many young plants and animals. Some photos courtesy of USFWS, NOAA & NPS.
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4327 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Where do you think these organisms live? Decide which ecosystem they belong in and write the answer below the image: wetland, desert, coral reef, or prairie. Kinds of Ecosystems
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4328 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Energy in an Ecosystem bacteria earthworms mushrooms Sun Energy Cycle The energy cycle within an ecosystem, determines which populations survive and which die. All living things need energy. Ultimately, the Sun is the source of all energy in an ecosystem. Energy flows from the Sun, to producers, then to consumers and finally to decomposers. Producers, Consumers & Decomposers The living organisms in an ecosystem can be divided into three groups: producers, consumers and decomposers. Producers are living things that make their own food using light energy from the Sun. Consumers are animals that get their energy by eating other organisms. Decomposers are organisms that get their energy by breaking down dead plant and animal matter. Examples include mushrooms, bacteria and earthworms. prairie dogs coyote ferret grasshopper rabbit
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4328 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Sort the consumers, producers and decomposers. Write the group type below each organism. Energy in an Ecosystem
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4329 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Changes in Ecosystems How do ecosystems change? Ecosystems are always changing. Some changes are so big that an ecosystem can die, or change into another kind of ecosystem. For example, if a fire burns most of a forest, its plant life will have to start over again. New growth will start with grass, weeds and small shrubs. Soon young trees, or saplings, will sprout, but it will be many years before there will be tall, strong trees standing in that place again. Environmental Changes & Effects On Organisms Another change that may happen because of a forest fire is that certain populations of animals will leave the area to find food and shelter elsewhere. Other populations that depend on those animals for food will also leave or die out. For example, when trees burn, squirrels and birds leave, and foxes and coyotes follow. When the plants start growing back, animals that eat them will start to return to the forest. Over time, if left alone, the forest ecosystem will come back. Life goes on, only now it’s in a new kind of environment!
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4329 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause & Review Ecosystems can change for many reasons, including natural disasters. Changes in Ecosystems Mount St. Helens erupted in Oregon in 1980. Describe how you think this affected organisms living in the area. _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Think of other reasons that ecosystems might change. Describe some. _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Mt. St. Helens before eruption Mt. St. Helens today Photos courtesy of USGS.
Key Vocabulary Terms © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4330 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Climate the weather of a location over a long period of time Community all of the populations that live and interact in an area Consumer an organism that get its energy by eating other organisms Decomposer an organism that get its energy by breaking down dead plant and animal matter; includes mushrooms, bacteria & worms Ecosystem a community of all living and nonliving things that work together in an environment Energy usable power that comes from food, Sunlight and other sources; the power or ability to make things grow and move about Environment everything around an organism; it is made up of living and nonliving things in an area Habitat a place where an organism lives Living thing an organism that can grow and reproduce Fungi decompose debris. Chipmunks eat fruits and nuts and help spread seeds. Niche the role that an organism has in an ecosystem Nonliving thing a thing that does not grow and reproduce; examples include water, nutrients and soil Nutrient a substance that provides an organism with energy and is needed for growth Population a group of living organisms of the same kind living in the same place Producer a living thing that makes its own food using light energy from the Sun
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4330 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Key Vocabulary Terms Define it! Use it in a sentence! Draw it! Provide examples! ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Mapping a Term Term __________________________________________________________
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