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Science Grade 3

Science, Grade 3

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts Grade Grade 333 34-3001 \|xiBAHBDy01208lz[ Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2009 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with black-line masters of the charts for students to fill-in, key vocabulary terms, corresponding quiz questions for each chart, along with answers Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to fill in the call-outs of key structures and summarize key concepts. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. On the reverse side of each black-line master are questions corresponding to each Flip Chart topic which can be used as further review or as a means of assessment. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade-appropriate curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Main Parts of Plants How Do Plants Grow? Grouping of Plants Grouping of Animals Relationships Among Living Things Rocks, Minerals & Soil Changes on Earth Matter & Its Properties Work & Machines The Solar System
Seed variety Flower parts Leaf types A plant has many important parts, such as its roots, stem, leaves, and flowers. The parts of a plant have many functions that make it possible for the plant to live. Roots help support the plant by anchoring it into the ground. Roots have tiny hairs that absorb nutrients from the soil, which a plant needs to grow. These root hairs also take in water from the soil, which a plant needs to live and grow. The main job of the flower of a plant is to make seeds. New plants grow from these seeds. Some plants form fruit to help protect their seeds. Leaves are the part of a green plant where the plant’s own food is made through a process called photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the process by which a green plant makes its own food using energy from the sun, water it gets from the soil, and the air. During the process of photosynthesis, the leaves of a green plant take in carbon dioxide through the stomates (tiny holes). Photosynthesis creates food for the plant and at the same time releases oxygen (through the stomates) into the air. leaf roots node flower stomate terminal bud stem pistil style stigma ovary anther stamen filament oxygen (O2) out carbon dioxide (CO2) in seeds fruit tap root fibrous root simple compound pine needles A plant’s stem is used to support the plant. The stem allows the plant’s leaves to reach above the soil so that they may take in the sunshine. A plant’s stem carries the water and nutrients that are taken in by the plant’s roots to the rest of the plant. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4301 www.newpathlearning.com Main Parts of Plants
Seed variety Flower parts \|xiBAHBDy01720sz\ The main parts of plants are: _____________________________ _____________________________. Roots help support the plant by _____________________________ _____________________________. What is the function of the leaves? _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________. How do plants make their own food? _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________. The main job of the flower of a plant is to ___________________________ _______________________________. Key Vocabulary Terms anther carbon dioxide (CO2) compound leaf fibrous root filament flower fruit leaf node ovary oxygen (O2) pine needles pistil phloem pith root seed simple leaf stamen stem stigma stomate style tap root terminal bud xylem Leaf types What is the purpose of the stem? 1. _______________________ _______________________ 2. _______________________ _______________________ 3. ______________________ ____________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4301 www.newpathlearning.com Main Parts of Plants
tuber embryo cotyledons seed coat rhizome bulb Most plants begin as a seed. The seeds of a plant contain everything it needs to form the leaves, the stem, and roots of a plant. Seeds also contain a food supply which is used to help the new plant grow and develop. Germination is the process by which the plant embryo inside a seed grows and a seedling grows above soil. A seedling is a young plant that is in its early stages of growth. A tuber is a thick, usually underground stem of a plant, which has buds from which a new plant can grow. A potato is an example of a tuber. A rhizome is a flat, usually underground stem that roots grow out of which new plants grow from. A bulb is a special underground stem. It is a plant in a small package that contains its own food supply needed for growth. What a plant needs to grow… Plants need many essential things in order to grow, such as: water, air, nutrients, sunlight, and warm temperature. Plants need their space too! spores Seedless Plants Plants that do not have flowers, such as ferns, do not make seeds, they produce spores instead. Plants have different life cycles… A flowering plant’s life cycle describes how long a plant takes to grow, flower, set seed, and die. flower seed germinates seedling grows plant flowers plant dies plant releases seeds Other ways plants can grow without a seed… Plant Life Cycle How do plants grow? © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4302 www.newpathlearning.com
Plant Life Cycle © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4302 What does a plant need to grow? _________________________________ _________________________________ Key Vocabulary Terms bulb seedling cotyledons spores embryo tuber flowering plant germination Plant Life Cycle rhizome seed seed coat seedless plant What is germination? _____________________________ _____________________________ What is the purpose of a seed? _________________________________ _________________________________ What is the life cycle of a flowering plant? _________________________________ _________________________________ ______________________ How do seedless plants reproduce? _____________________________ _____________________________ Describe three ways plants can reproduce without a seed. ___________________________ ________________________ ______________________ How do plants grow? www.newpathlearning.com \|xiBAHBDy01718pzY
bark sapwood heartwood cambium inner bark Many plants have leaves that look similar while others have totally different kind of leaves. Plant and tree leaves may be different in size, shape, and color. Trees can be placed into groups according to whether or not they lose their leaves in the fall. Deciduous trees are trees that lose their leaves in the fall. A maple tree is a deciduous tree. Coniferous trees do not lose their leaves in the fall. Coniferous trees have leaves that look like needles. A pine tree is an example of a coniferous tree. tree trunk stem Other ways to group plants A variety of plants and trees have long roots that grow deep into the ground, while others have short roots that grow very shallow. Plants are often put into groups by the type of parts or structures they have. They can be grouped according to their types of leaves, stems, flowers, roots, and even seeds. Plants and trees also have various stems. For example, the stem of most trees is thick, strong, and has bark protecting it; the stem of a tulip is thin, green, and fragile. Plants and trees can also be put into groups depending on whether or not they produce cones. Flowering plants and trees produce flowers. Coniferous trees do not produce flowers, they produce cones instead. Plants can also be put into groups according to how they grow. For instance, some plants may grow low to the ground while other kinds of flowering plants may grow high above the ground. Plants can also be put into groups according to how long they live. Some flowering plants only live one year while others die during the fall and then in the spring they grow again. Cone Variety Leaf Variety Maple Oak Pine (needles) White Ash Sycamore Deciduous flower cone Coniferous shallow roots deep roots © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4303 Grouping of Plants www.newpathlearning.com
Describe other ways to group plants. _____________________________ _____________________________ Cone Variety Leaf Variety Key Vocabulary Terms bark Oak leaf cone Pine needles coniferous stem deciduous shallow roots deep roots Sycamore leaf flower tree trunk flowering plants White ash leaf Maple leaf How are plants grouped? __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ How are leaves alike? __________________________________________ __________________________________________ How are leaves different? __________________________________________ __________________________________________ What is the difference between a deciduous tree and a coniferous tree? ___________________________________ ________________________________ Which type of tree produces cones? ____________________________ Describe the types of stems that plants and trees have. ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4303 www.newpathlearning.com Grouping of Plants \|xiBAHBDy01717sz\
adult immature frog tadpoles eggs Amphibian Life Cycle Animals can be classified, or grouped together, by the things they have in common, like by how they act, where they live, or how they look. Many scientists separate animals into two main groups, those animals that have a backbone from those that do not have a backbone. These two groups are called vertebrates and invertebrates. Vertebrates are animals that have a backbone. There are five main groups of vertebrates based on specific animal traits and characteristics. Those groups include fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. Fish are vertebrates that live their whole life in water. Fish breathe oxygen through their gills and have scales on their bodies. Birds are vertebrates that have feathers, wings, and a beak. Most birds can fly. Birds breathe oxygen through their lungs. Mammals are vertebrates that have hair, breathe through their lungs, and make milk to feed their young. Reptiles are also a group of invertebrates. Snakes, crocodiles, and turtles are all examples of reptiles. Reptiles have tough skin with scales, most reptiles lay eggs. Sea jellies are a type of invertebrate. Sea jellies have soft bodies, live in the ocean, and parts of their body can sting. Jellyfish are examples of sea jellies. Arthropods’ skeletons are on the outside of their bodies. Their bodies are made up of several parts and sections. Insects, crabs, and spiders are all examples of arthropods. Worms are invertebrates that have long, soft bodies and no legs. There are flat worms, round worms, and segmented worms. Worms live in many different places, including the ocean! Mollusks are invertebrates that have soft bodies. Many mollusks have shells to protect and support their soft bodies. An example of a mollusk is a snail. Amphibians are another group of vertebrates which include frogs and toads. Amphibians live in water and on land. Most amphibians start off breathing through their gills in water. As an amphibian grows and begins to live on land, it develops lungs to breathe with. Invertebrates are animals that do not have a backbone. Most animals living in the world today are invertebrates. Most kinds of invertebrates are insects. Invertebrates have liquid sacs or shells that they use as support for their bodies. There are four major kinds of invertebrates, which include sea jellies, arthropods, worms, and mollusks. scales gills jellyfish snail beetle worms hermit crab anemone clam Grouping of Animals backbone © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4304 www.newpathlearning.com
Amphibian Life Cycle Key Vocabulary Terms amphibians lungs arthropods mammals backbone mollusks birds reptiles fish sea jellies gills vertebrates insect worms invertebrates How are animals grouped or classified? ____________________________ ______________________________________________________________ What are the two main groups of animals? __________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Describe a vertebrate animal. _____________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Describe the five groups of vertebrate animals: Describe an invertebrate animal. _____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Describe the four major kinds of invertebrates: Sea jellies ________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ . Arthropods _______________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ . Worms ___________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ . Mollusks _______________________________________ ______________________________________________ . Fish ___________________________ _______________________________. Reptiles _______________________ _______________________________. Birds __________________________ _______________________________. Mammals ______________________ _______________________________. Amphibians ____________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________. Grouping of Animals © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4304 www.newpathlearning.com \|xiBAHBDy01716lz[
Living things that break down waste or living things that have died in an environment are called decomposers. Decay occurs when decomposers break down dead animals and waste. Decay adds nutrients to the soil which then helps plants to grow. Living things interact in many ways. These interactions can help, harm, or do nothing to a living thing. Living things can help each other in groups. An example of this is members of a wolf pack protecting each other. An example of one living thing helping another living thing without being helped itself or harmed is barnacles on a whale. Two living things can both help each other at the same time. An example of this is a bee spreading pollen and getting nectar for itself. Living things need energy in order to survive. Energy is passed between living things through a food chain. Food chains include producers and consumers interacting together. An example of a food chain is a plant eaten by a mouse which is then eaten by an eagle. Consumers eat producers. When a consumer eats a producer, energy is passed from the plant to the animal. A food web is the energy flow within a community and is made up of more than one food chain. Producer Plants are producers, which means that they can make their own food using energy from sunlight. Consumer Living things that are not able to make their own food are called consumers. Consumers are made up of herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores. An herbivore is a living thing that only eats plants. A carnivore is a living thing that only eats other animals. A living thing that eats both plants and other animals is called an omnivore. e n e rg y flo w energy flow hawk eagle ferret prairie dog mouse snake beetle butterfly prairie chicken prairie dog rabbit grasshopper coyote © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4305 Relationships Among Living Things www.newpathlearning.com
e n e rg y flo w energy flow Key Vocabulary Terms carnivore food chain community food web consumer herbivore decomposer omnivore energy producer How do living things interact with one another? ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ What is a food chain? ________________________________________________________ What is a food web? ________________________________________________________ How does energy pass from one organism to another? ________________________________________________________ What is a decomposer? __________________________________ _________________ ______________ ____________ ____________ ____________ What is a consumer? ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ What is a carnivore? ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ What is a producer? ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ What is a herbivore? ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ What is an omnivore? _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ Relationships Among Living Things © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4305 www.newpathlearning.com \|xiBAHBDy01721pzY
Magma Erosion Weathering Transportation Deposition Heat & Pr essure Metamorphism Uplift Compaction Cementation SEDIMENTARY ROCK Heat & Pr essure Metamorphism IGNEOUS ROCK METAMORPHIC ROCK Cooling Crystalization Rocks, Minerals & Soil Rocks are solid materials found in nature made up of minerals. A mineral is a natural material usually found in the ground. Rocks can be classifi ed, or grouped, into three main groups according to how they were formed. streak plate © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4306 www.newpathlearning.com Igneous rocks are formed underground when melted rock deep below the Earth’s surface becomes trapped in small areas underground. Melted rock found beneath the Earth’s surface is called magma. As the magma in the small areas underground cools, igneous rocks are formed. Igneous rocks are also formed above ground when lava erupts from a volcano and then cools forming igneous rocks above the Earth’s surface. Lava is magma that comes above the Earth’s surface during a volcano. Sedimentary rocks are formed when sediment piled up at the bottom of a body of water is pressed together over thousands of years. Sedimentary rocks are formed in layers. Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have been changed by heat, pressure or both. When rocks are buried, heat and pressure is applied to the rock causing the minerals inside the rock to change. Igneous and sedimentary rocks change into metamorphic rocks. Minerals are the most common solid material found on Earth. Minerals have different properties that can be used to identify them. Luster is a property of minerals that shows how much light is refl ected by a mineral. Other properties of minerals are the color of the streak it leaves behind if it is rubbed against another surface, and its hardness. The hardest mineral of them all is a diamond. Examples of rare minerals include gold and silver. Lead, uorite, and iron are examples of other minerals. Almost everything we use in everyday life is made of minerals or contains minerals. In addition, our bodies need select minerals such as iron, calcium and sodium to stay healthy which we get from fruits and vegetables. Soil is loose material made mostly of tiny pieces of rock that covers much of the Earth’s surface. It is made up of three main layers: topsoil, subsoil, and bedrock. Soil is part of the ecosystem needed to support all life on Earth. topsoil subsoil bedrock Sedimentary Rocks Metamorphic Rocks sandstone halite limestone marble gneiss quartz pumice obsidian granite Igneous Rocks Minerals gold ore galena (with silver) fluorite calcite magnetite (iron source)
Magma Erosion Weathering Transportation Deposition Heat & Pr essure Metamorphism Uplift Compaction Cementation SEDIMENTARY ROCK Heat & Pr essure Metamorphism IGNEOUS ROCK METAMORPHIC ROCK Cooling Crystalization Rocks, Minerals & Soil What are rocks? _____________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Igneous rocks are ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ Sedimentary rocks are _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ Metamorphic rocks are _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ Sedimentary Rocks Metamorphic Rocks sandstone halite limestone marble gneiss quartz pumice obsidian granite Igneous Rocks Minerals gold ore galena (with silver) fluorite calcite magnetite (iron source) Key Vocabulary Terms bedrock minerals deposition rocks erosion Sedimentary rocks hardness soil Igneous rocks streak lava subsoil luster topsoil magma weathering Metamorphic rocks How are rocks grouped or classifi ed? __________________ ___________________________________________________ How are minerals identifi ed? __________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ What are some properties of minerals? __________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ What are some examples of minerals which we use in our everyday lives? ________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ What is soil?_______________________ _________________________________ What are the three layers of soil? _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4306 www.newpathlearning.com \|xiBAHBDy01730rzu
Changes on Earth © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4307 www.newpathlearning.com crust The Earth is made up of three main layers. We live on the outer layer of the Earth called the crust. The Earth’s crust is made up of many different rocks. The layer beneath the Earth’s crust is called the mantle. The Earth’s mantle is made of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The innermost layer of the Earth is called the core. The Earth’s core is made of metal. The Earth’s core is hot enough to melt but the center of the core is packed together so tightly that it remains a solid. The outer section of the Earth’s core however is hot, thick liquid. core mantle A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s crust which hot, melted rock forcefully comes out of when pressure is built up inside the Earth. Magma is melted rock found beneath the Earth’s surface. Lava is melted rock that comes above the Earth’s surface. An earthquake is a sudden shift in the Earth’s crust that causes the ground to shake and vibrate violently. Most earthquakes happen near faults. Faults are large cracks in the Earth’s crust. glacier mountain lake valley Landforms are many different solid features formed on top of the Earth’s crust; some also involve bodies of water. A glacier is a slow moving large body of ice. A river is a natural flow of water that is larger than a brook or a creek. A lake is a large body of still water surrounded by land. A valley is a low, narrow area that is formed by rivers and glaciers. A hill is an elevated land but it is not as tall as a mountain. A mountain is elevated land that reaches high above the Earth’s surface and is larger than a hill. An ocean is made up of saltwater. Oceans cover just about ¾ of the E arth’s surface. A coast is the land that is right next to the ocean that forms the coastline. river ocean coast A plain is a large, mostly flat area of land. seismic waves focus fault cone cloud of ash pipe magma lava flow dike Images courtesy of USGS, NPS, USFWS. Weathering is the process of rocks breaking into smaller pieces. Water can change the minerals in rocks making the rocks weaker and can cause rocks to weather and to break up into smaller pieces. The movement of land that has been weathered is called erosion. Erosion is caused by water, wind, gravity, and glaciers. plain
\|xiBAHBDy01725nzW Key Vocabulary Terms coast magma core mantle crust mountain earthquake ocean fault plain focus river glacier seismic wave hill valley lake volcano landform weathering lava Changes on Earth © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4307 www.newpathlearning.com Images courtesy of USGS, NPS, USFWS. Describe the three layers that make up the Earth. ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ What are landforms? ________________________________ __________________________________________________ A glacier is _______________________________________ . An ocean is ______________________________________ . A river is _________________________________________ . A lake is _________________________________________ . A coast is ________________________________________ . A valley is ________________________________________ . A plain is ________________________________________ . A hill is __________________________________________ . A mountain is ____________________________________ . What is a volcano? ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ What is the difference between magma and lava? ______________________ ______________________ What is an earthquake? ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ What is weathering? ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________
An object’s mass should not be confused with how much it weighs. For example, an object’s mass is the same no matter if it is on Earth or on the Moon. An object’s weight is different on the Moon than it is on Earth. Image courtesy of NASA. Properties of Matter A property of matter is a feature, trait, or characteristic. Matter can have many different properties. Properties are used to describe an object. Some properties of matter can be measured using tools, such as a balance to measure an object’s mass, and a graduated cylinder to measure the volume of liquids. Volume is the amount of space matter takes up. Solids, liquids, and gases all have volume. Mass is how much there is of something. Scientists most often use metric measurements when measuring matter. A property of an item may be its hardness, like a brick. Size is also a property of matter. The size of something has to do with how big, small, wide, or thin something is. The size of an object can be measured using the metric units millimeters (mm), centimeters (cm), and meters (m). Density is a property of matter that tells how much matter fits into a certain space. Buoyancy is also a property of matter. Buoyancy is whether an object sinks or floats in water. Everything around us is made of matter. Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. All matter is made up of different kinds of particles that are combined together in different ways. The Periodic Table of the Elements An element is matter that is made up of one type of particle. An atom is the basic building block of matter that make up all objects. It is the tiniest particle of any element. The table in which scientists place and organize more than 100 different elements is called the periodic table. molecule model Hydrogen atom Molecules are made up of several different types of atoms. A third state of matter is gas. A gas is matter in which its particles are very far apart. Gas, like the air around us, has no shape and most gases are invisible. States of Matter Solid Liquid Gas Solid matter always has and keeps the same shape. A solid is matter in which its particles fit together tightly. An example of a solid is a rock. A liquid is a second state of matter in which the particles are close together, but not as close as in a solid. Liquids do not keep the same shape. Liquids take the shape of whatever container they are poured into. An example of a liquid is water. Matter and its Properties © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4308 www.newpathlearning.com
Describe properties of matter and ways to measure them. Mass ____________________________________ _________________________________________ Volume __________________________________ _________________________________________ Hardness __________________________________ _________________________________________ Size __________________________________ _________________________________________ Density __________________________________ _________________________________________ Buoyancy __________________________________ _________________________________________ An object’s mass should not be confused with how much it weighs. For example, an object’s mass is the same no matter if it is on Earth or on the Moon. An object’s weight is different on the Moon than it is on Earth. Image courtesy of NASA. Key Vocabulary Terms atom mass buoyancy matter density Periodic Table element size gas solid hardness volume liquid The Periodic Table of the Elements molecule model Hydrogen atom Molecules are made up of several different types of atoms. Gas What is matter? ________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ What is an element? _____________________________________ _____________________________________ What is the purpose of a periodic table? _____________________________________ _____________________________________ What is an atom? _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ States of Matter Solid Liquid Describe the three states of matter: Solid _________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ Liquid ________________ ______________________