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Science: Physical Science

Physical Science - Middle School

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts PHYSICALSCIENCE PHYSICALSCIENCE 34-6009 \|xiBAHBDy01223ozX Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2009 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with black-line masters of the charts for students to fill-in, key vocabulary terms, corresponding quiz questions for each chart, along with answers Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to fill in the call-outs of key structures and summarize key concepts. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. On the reverse side of each black-line master are questions corresponding to each Flip Chart topic which can be used as further review or as a means of assessment. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade-appropriate curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Work & Machines Forces & Motion Properties of Atoms Elements & the Periodic Table Chemical Reactions Acids, Bases & Salts Electricity Magnetism Sound Light
increases force increases force decreases force force force motion motion decreases distance decreases distance increases distance Work is the exertion of force on an object that causes the object to move in the same direction in which the force is applied. If the object does not move as a result of the force applied, no work is done. How Much Work? Work = Force x Distance Newton (N) is the unit of measure for force, and meter (m) is the basic unit for distance. Work is expressed in (N m) or the joule (J). Calculating Power Power is the rate at which work is done or the rate at which energy is transferred. To determine the amount of power (P), you divide the amount of work (W) done by the amount of time (t) it takes to do the work. Calculating Work To determine the amount of work, you multiply force times distance. The unit of measure for power is expressed in joules per second (J/s) also known as the Watt (W). Work (W) Time (t) Machines 1. A nutcracker increases the force but decreases the distance over which the force is applied. 2. A hammer decreases the force but increases the distance. 4. A simple pulley changes the direction of the input force, but the amount of input and output force remain the same. 3. A screwdriver used as a lever, increases the force and decreases the distance. lever inclined plane compound machine pulley gears wheel & axle wheel & axle Types of Machines changes direction of force - output remains the same Work is being done. No work is done. 1. 2. 3. 4. increases force increases force decreases force decreases distance decreases distance increases distance Machines Simple machines are devices designed to make work easier by changing the amount of force you exert, the direction of the force or the distance over which you exert the force. 1. A nutcracker increases the force but decreases the distance over which the force is applied. 2. A hammer decreases the force but increases the distance. 3. A simple pulley changes the direction of the input force, but the amount of input and output force remain the same. 4. A screwdriver used as a lever, increases the force and decreases the distance. changes direction of force - output remains the same 1. 2. 3. 4. 120 N 1 m 2 m Work = 120 N x 1 m = 120 N•m Work = 120 N x 2 m = 240 N•m Increasing the distance the weights are lifted also increases the amount of work done. Meaning of Work Power (P) = Simple machines are devices designed to make work easier by changing the amount of force you exert, the direction of the force or the distance over which you exert the force. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4801 www.newpathlearning.com Work & Machines
Work (W) Time (t) Power (P) = force motion Meaning of Work What is work? _________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ How Much Work? Work = __________ x __________ ________________ is the unit of measure for force, and ________________ is the basic unit for distance. Work is expressed in ________________ or the ________________ . Calculating Power What is power? _______________________________ _____________________________________________ To determine the amount of power (P), you divide the amount of ________________ done by the amount of ________________ takes to do the work. Calculating Work To determine the amount of work, you multiply ________________ times ________________ . The unit of measure for power is expressed in ________________ also known as the ________________. Machines What are simple machines? _________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 1. A nutcracker ________________ the ________________ but ________________ the ________________ over which the force is applied. 2. A hammer ________________ the ________________ but ________________ the ________________ . 3. A screwdriver used as a ________________ , ________________ the ________________ and ________________ the ________________ . 4. A simple pulley ________________ the ________________ of the ________________ ________________ , but the amount of ________________ and ________________ ________________ remain the ________________ . Types of Machines Work is being done. 1. 2. 3. 4. 120 N 1 m 2 m Increasing the distance the weights are lifted also increases the amount of work done. Key Vocabulary Terms force power joule (j) simple machine meter (m) Watt (w) Newton (N) work © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4801 www.newpathlearning.com Work & Mach ines \|xiBAHBDy01808nzW
US A Gravity & Motion Gravity is a type of force that pulls objects toward each other and toward the Earth. The amount of gravitational force depends upon the mass of the objects and the distance between them. The acceleration of an object near the surface of the Earth due to gravity is 9.8 m/s2. If both the acorn and leaf fall from the tree at the same time, air resistance will slow down the leaf and the acorn will hit the ground first. In a vacuum, both will reach the ground at the same time. Newton’s Law of Gravitation All objects in the universe apply a gravitational force (force of attraction) on other objects. The strength of the gravitational force is dependent upon the mass of the objects and the distance between them. The larger the mass of the objects, the larger the force is between the two objects. The farther away the two objects are, the weaker the gravitational force is between them. larger mass larger force similar size similar force larger distance weaker force gravity vacuum air resistance gravity Momentum acceleration acceleration acceleration acceleration What Is Force? Scientists define force as a push or a pull. A force is described by its strength and direction in which it exerts. A force provides an object with the energy to move, stop moving, or change direction. Newton (N) is the standard unit of measure for force. Newton’s Laws of Motion The scientist we usually think of when we talk about gravity and falling objects is Isaac Newton. Newton is credited with the development of three laws dealing with the movement of objects. Newton’s First Law of Motion An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion at the same speed and in the same direction unless a force acts on it. When the same force is applied to both carts, the acceleration of the empty cart will be greater than the acceleration of the loaded cart. Newton’s Third Law of Motion For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The amount of motion that takes place is momentum. To calculate momentum you multiply the mass of an object by its velocity. The momentum and velocity of an object are always in the same direction. When groups of objects are involved, if there is no outside force, the total momentum of the group does not change. For example, in a collision between two cars, momentum may be transferred from one car to the other but not lost. This is referred to as the Law of Conservation of Momentum. Newton’s Second Law of Motion Acceleration is produced when a force acts on an object. Acceleration of an object depends on its mass and the amount of force applied. The relationship of acceleration (a) to mass (m) and force (F) can be expressed in mathematical terms as follows: M x V = Momentum object at rest object in motion © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4802 www.newpathlearning.com Forces & Motion
Key Vocabulary Terms acceleration force gravitational force gravity mass momentum motion Newton (N) speed velocity \|xiBAHBDy01803sz\ When the same force is applied to both carts, the acceleration of the empty cart will be greater than the acceleration of the loaded cart. acceleration acceleration acceleration acceleration USA What Is Force? _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ Gravity & Motion Define gravity: _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ The acceleration of an object near the surface of the Earth due to gravity is 9.8 m/s2. If both the acorn and leaf fall from the tree at the same time, air resistance will slow down the leaf and the acorn will hit the ground first. In a vacuum, both will reach the ground at the same time Newton’s Laws of Motion Who is Isaac Newton? _______________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Newton’s First Law of Motion __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ a = or F = x Newton’s Law of Gravitation ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ Newton’s Third Law of Motion __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ ________________________ Momentum The amount of motion that takes place is ____________________. To calculate momentum you multiply the ______________ of an object by its _________________. The momentum and velocity of an object are always in the same direction. When groups of objects are involved, if there is no outside force, the total momentum of the group does not change. For example, in a collision between two cars, momentum may be transferred from one car to the other but not lost. This is referred to as the ___________________________________. Newton’s Second Law of Motion __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ The relationship of acceleration (a) to mass (m) and force (F) can be expressed in mathematical terms as follows: x = Momentum ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ object at rest object in motion © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4802 www.newpathlearning.com Forces & Motion gravity vacuum air resistance gravity
Isotopes of Carbon Electron Dot Diagram H C O H H O H H O Na Cl Na+ Cl Carbon-12 6 neutrons Carbon-13 7 neutrons Carbon-14 8 neutrons Sodium atom Hydrogen atom Oxygen atom Water molecule Chlorine atom Ionic compound - sodium chloride (salt) Cl- Na+ Crystal structure of salt (NaCl) Proton Neutron covalent bonds nucleus Carbon atom cloud of electrons The Atom Atoms are the basic building blocks of matter that make up everything around us. A pencil, the air, even your body is made up of atoms! There are 90 naturally occurring kinds of atoms. Scientists in labs have been able to make about 25 more. An atom is the smallest part of an element that has all the properties of that element. Particles of an Atom The modern atomic model, suggests that an atom has two particles in the nucleus, a proton which carries a positive charge and a neutron or neutrally charged particle. Surrounding the nucleus is an electron cloud with electrons which carry a negative charge, moving in various directions. The atomic mass number is the sum of the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. The number of protons is the atomic number of that atom. How Do Atoms Differ? Atoms of the same element can have different numbers of neutrons. Such atoms with the same number of protons and a different number of neutrons are called isotopes. For example, the three isotopes of Carbon have the same number of protons (or the same atomic number) and electrons but they differ in their number of neutrons and thus have a different atomic mass. Valence Electrons & Bonding Electrons surrounding the nucleus are organized in energy levels. An electron that is in the outermost energy level of an atom is a valence electron. A valence electron determines an atom’s chemical properties and whether an atom will form bonds. A bond is the force that joins two atoms together forming a new substance. Ionic Bonds An ionic bond is formed when one or more valence electrons are transferred from one atom to another. Covalent Bonds A covalent bond is formed when atoms share one or more pairs of electrons. An atom’s valence electrons are represented by dots placed around the symbol of an element. O H H transfer of electron Particle Proton Neutron Electron p+ n e- 1+ 0 1- 1 1 1 1,836 Symbol Charge Particles in an Atom Relative Mass (amu) Model C 6 Carbon Element name Symbol Atomic number Atomic mass 12 © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4803 www.newpathlearning.com Properties of Atoms
Carbon-12 Carbon-13 Carbon-14 H H O H H O Water molecule Na Cl Na+ Cl Ionic compound - sodium chloride (salt) Isotopes of Carbon \|xiBAHBDy01805mzV The Atom What are atoms? ______________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ Particles of an Atom The modern atomic model, suggests that an atom has two particles in the ____________________, a ____________________ which carries a positive charge and a ____________________or neutrally charged particle. Surrounding the nucleus is an electron cloud with ____________________ which carry a ____________________ charge, moving in various directions. The ________________________________________ is the sum of the ____________________and ____________________in the nucleus of an atom. ____________________________________ is the ___________________________ of that atom. How Do Atoms Differ? What are isotopes? ___________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ Valence Electrons and Bonding Electrons surrounding the nucleus are organized in ____________________ ____________________ . An electron that is in the outermost energy level of an atom is a ____________________ ____________________ . A valence electron determines an atom’s ____________________ ____________________ and whether an atom will form ____________________ . A ____________________ is the force that joins two atoms together forming a new substance. Ionic Bonds How do ionic bonds form? _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ Covalent Bonds How do covalent bonds form? ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Electron Dot Diagram H C O An atom’s valence electrons are represented by dots placed around the symbol of an element. O H H C 6 Carbon 12 Key Vocabulary Terms atom atomic mass atomic model atomic number charge chemical bond covalent bond electron electron cloud element energy level ionic bond isotope negative charge neutron nucleus particle positive charge proton valence electron Carbon atom Number of neutrons Number of neutrons Number of neutrons © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4803 www.newpathlearning.com Properties of Atoms
H H 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 2 3 4 5 6 7 Hydrogen He 2 Helium Ne 10 Neon Ar 18 Argon Kr 36 Krypton Xe 54 Xenon Rn 86 Radon Br Hg Hg 35 Bromine Cl 17 Chlorine F 9 Fluorine O 8 Oxygen N 7 Nitrogen C 6 Carbon B 5 Boron Li 3 Lithium Na 11 Sodium K 19 Potassium Ca 20 Calcium Rb 37 Rubidium Cs 55 Cesium Fr 87 Francium Ra 88 Radium Ac 89 Actinium Rf 104 Rutherfordium Db 105 Dubnium Sg 106 Seaborgium Bh 107 Bohrium Hs 108 Hassium Mt 109 Meitnerium 110 Ununnilium 111 Unununium 112 Ununbium Uub 114 Ununquaternium Uuq Uuu Uun Ba 56 Barium La 57 Lanthanum Hf 72 Hafnium Ta 73 Tantalum W 74 Tungstun Re 75 Rhenium Os 76 Osmium Ir 77 Iridium Pt 78 Platinum Au 79 Gold 80 Mercury Tl 81 Thallium Pb 82 Lead Bi 83 84 Bismuth Po Polonium Sr 38 Strontium Y 39 Yttrium Zr 40 Zirconium Nb 41 Niobium Mo 42 Molybdenum Tc Tc 43 Technetium Ru 44 Ruthenium Rh 45 Rhodium Pd 46 Palladium Ag 47 Silver Cd 48 Cadmium In 49 Indium Sn 50 Tin Sc 21 Scandium Ti 22 Titanium V 23 Vanadium Cr 24 Chromium Mn 25 Manganese Fe 26 Iron Co 27 Cobalt Ni Ni 28 Nickel Cu 29 Copper Zn 30 Zinc Ga 31 Gallium Al 13 Aluminum Mg 12 Magnesium Be 4 Berylium Si 14 Silicon P 15 Phosphorus S 16 Sulfur Se 34 Selenium As 33 Arsenic Ge 32 Germanium Sb 51 Antimony Te 52 Tellurium I 53 Iodine At 85 Astatine column Lanthanids solid liquid gas unknown metal metalloid nonmetal Ce 58 Cerium Th 90 Thorium Pa 91 Protactinium Pr 59 Praseodymium Nd 60 Neodymium U 92 Uranium Np 93 Neptunium Pm 61 Promethium Sm 62 Samarium Pu 94 Plutonium Am 95 Americium Eu 63 Europium Gd 64 Gadolinium Cm 96 Curium Bk 97 Berkelium Tb 65 Terbium Dy 66 Dysprosium Cf 98 Californium Es 99 Einsteinium Ho 67 Holmium Er 68 Erbium Fm 100 Fermium Md 101 Mendelevium Tm 69 Thulium Yb 70 Ytterbium Lu 71 Lutetium No 102 Nobelium Lr 103 Lawrencium Actinids Chemical Symbol Background H 1 Hydrogen He 2 Helium Ne 10 Neon Ar 18 Argon Kr 36 Krypton Xe 54 Xenon Rn 86 Radon Br Hg 35 Bromine Cl 17 Chlorine F 9 Fluorine O 8 Oxygen N 7 Nitrogen C 6 Carbon B 5 Boron Li 3 Lithium Na 11 Sodium K 19 Potassium Ca 20 Calcium Rb 37 Rubidium Cs 55 Cesium Fr 87 Francium Ra 88 Radium Ac 89 Actinium Rf 104 Rutherfordium Db 105 Dubnium Sg 106 Seaborgium Bh 107 Bohrium Hs 108 Hassium Mt 109 Meitnerium 110 Darmstadtium 111 Roentgenium 112 Copernicium Cn 114 Flerovium Fl 116 Livermorium Lv Rg Ds Ba 56 Barium La 57 Lanthanum Hf 72 Hafnium Ta 73 Tantalum W 74 Tungstun Re 75 Rhenium Os 76 Osmium Ir 77 Iridium Pt 78 Platinum Au 79 Gold 80 Mercury Tl 81 Thallium Pb 82 Lead Bi 83 84 Bismuth Po Polonium Sr 38 Strontium Y 39 Yttrium Zr 40 Zirconium Nb 41 Niobium Mo 42 Molybdenum Tc 43 Technetium Ru 44 Ruthenium Rh 45 Rhodium Pd 46 Palladium Ag 47 Silver Cd 48 Cadmium In 49 Indium Sn 50 Tin Sc 21 Scandium Ti 22 Titanium V 23 Vanadium Cr 24 Chromium Mn 25 Manganese Fe 26 Iron Co 27 Cobalt Ni 28 Nickel Cu 29 Copper Zn 30 Zinc Ga 31 Gallium Al 13 Aluminum Mg 12 Magnesium Be 4 Berylium Si 14 Silicon P 15 Phosphorus S 16 Sulfur Se 34 Selenium As 33 Arsenic Ge 32 Germanium Sb 51 Antimony Te 52 Tellurium I 53 Iodine At 85 Astatine Ce 58 Cerium Th 90 Pa 91 Pr 59 Praseodymium Nd 60 Neodymium U 92 Np 93 Pm 61 Promethium Sm 62 Samarium Pu 94 Am 95 Eu 63 Europium Gd 64 Gadolinium Cm 96 Bk 97 Tb 65 Terbium Dy 66 Dysprosium Cf 98 Es 99 Ho 67 Holmium Er 68 Erbium Fm 100 Md 101 Tm 69 Thulium Yb 70 Ytterbium Lu 71 Lutetium No 102 Lr 103 Thorium Protactinium Uranium Neptunium Plutonium Americium Curium Berkelium Californium Einsteinium Fermium Mendelevium Nobelium Lawrencium © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4804 www.newpathlearning.com Elements & the Periodic Table O 8 Oxygen Element name Chemical Symbol Atomic number Atomic mass 16 Periodic Table of the Elements What are elements? Elements are the basic building blocks of matter. Each element is made up of one type of atom which determines its properties. Each element is represented by a chemical symbol. The Periodic Table groups elements in an organized fashion. Each element has its own unique symbol. Elements in each column have similar chemical properties. Elements in each row are arranged according to the number of protons. The number of protons (atomic number) increases from left to right in each row. Group 1: Alkali Metals These metals are very reactive which are only found in compounds. Group 2: Alkaline Earth Metals These metals are fairly reactive, conduct electricity and are only found in compounds. Magnesium and calcium are the two most common elements in this group. Group 3-12: Transition Metals These metals are less reactive than metals in Group 1 and 2. They are hard, shiny and good conductors of electricity. Elements such as zinc, cadmium and others in this group are used to make colorful paint compounds. The atomic mass number is the sum of the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. The number of protons is the atomic number of that atom. A period is a horizontal row of elements A column of elements is known as a group or family. Hydrogen Hydrogen is set apart from the rest of the elements because of its unique properties. It is the most abundant element in our universe. Group 13: Boron Group Aluminum is the most common element is this group. Group 14: Carbon Family Carbon makes up compounds such as proteins, fats, and carbohydrates necessary for all life on Earth. Group 15: Nitrogen Family Nitrogen makes up about 80% of the air in our atmosphere. Group 16: Oxygen Family Oxygen makes up about 20% of the air in our atmosphere. It is necessary for most living things on Earth. Oxygen is also necessary for combustion of any substance. Group 17: Halogens Halogens are very reactive nonmetals which are only found in compounds. Group 18: Noble Gases Noble gases are unreactive nonmetals which are colorless and odorless at room temperature. Some of these gases are used to make “neon” lights. Ea rth ’s Atmosphe re period
O 8 Oxygen 16 \|xiBAHBDy01802lz[ H H 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 2 3 4 5 6 7 Hydrogen He 2 Helium Ne 10 Neon Ar 18 Argon Kr 36 Krypton Xe 54 Xenon Rn 86 Radon Br Hg Hg 35 Bromine Cl 17 Chlorine F 9 Fluorine O 8 Oxygen N 7 Nitrogen C 6 Carbon B 5 Boron Li 3 Lithium Na 11 Sodium K 19 Potassium Ca 20 Calcium Rb 37 Rubidium Cs 55 Cesium Fr 87 Francium Ra 88 Radium Ac 89 Actinium Rf 104 Rutherfordium Db 105 Dubnium Sg 106 Seaborgium Bh 107 Bohrium Hs 108 Hassium Mt 109 Meitnerium 110 Ununnilium 111 Unununium 112 Ununbium Uub 114 Ununquaternium Uuq Uuu Uun Ba 56 Barium La 57 Lanthanum Hf 72 Hafnium Ta 73 Tantalum W 74 Tungstun Re 75 Rhenium Os 76 Osmium Ir 77 Iridium Pt 78 Platinum Au 79 Gold 80 Mercury Tl 81 Thallium Pb 82 Lead Bi 83 84 Bismuth Po Polonium Sr 38 Strontium Y 39 Yttrium Zr 40 Zirconium Nb 41 Niobium Mo 42 Molybdenum Tc Tc 43 Technetium Ru 44 Ruthenium Rh 45 Rhodium Pd 46 Palladium Ag 47 Silver Cd 48 Cadmium In 49 Indium Sn 50 Tin Sc 21 Scandium Ti 22 Titanium V 23 Vanadium Cr 24 Chromium Mn 25 Manganese Fe 26 Iron Co 27 Cobalt Ni Ni 28 Nickel Cu 29 Copper Zn 30 Zinc Ga 31 Gallium Al 13 Aluminum Mg 12 Magnesium Be 4 Berylium Si 14 Silicon P 15 Phosphorus S 16 Sulfur Se 34 Selenium As 33 Arsenic Ge 32 Germanium Sb 51 Antimony Te 52 Tellurium I 53 Iodine At 85 Astatine Lanthanids solid liquid gas unknown metal metalloid nonmetal Ce 58 Cerium Th 90 Thorium Pa 91 Protactinium Pr 59 Praseodymium Nd 60 Neodymium U 92 Uranium Np 93 Neptunium Pm 61 Promethium Sm 62 Samarium Pu 94 Plutonium Am 95 Americium Eu 63 Europium Gd 64 Gadolinium Cm 96 Curium Bk 97 Berkelium Tb 65 Terbium Dy 66 Dysprosium Cf 98 Californium Es 99 Einsteinium Ho 67 Holmium Er 68 Erbium Fm 100 Fermium Md 101 Mendelevium Tm 69 Thulium Yb 70 Ytterbium Lu 71 Lutetium No 102 Nobelium Lr 103 Actinids Chemical Symbol Background H 1 Hydrogen He 2 Helium Ne 10 Neon Ar 18 Argon Kr 36 Krypton Xe 54 Xenon Rn 86 Radon Br Hg 35 Bromine Cl 17 Chlorine F 9 Fluorine O 8 Oxygen N 7 Nitrogen C 6 Carbon B 5 Boron Li 3 Lithium Na 11 Sodium K 19 Potassium Ca 20 Calcium Rb 37 Rubidium Cs 55 Cesium Fr 87 Francium Ra 88 Radium Ac 89 Actinium Rf 104 Rutherfordium Db 105 Dubnium Sg 106 Seaborgium Bh 107 Bohrium Hs 108 Hassium Mt 109 Meitnerium 110 Darmstadtium 111 Roentgenium 112 Copernicium Cn 114 Flerovium Fl 116 Livermorium Lv Rg Ds Ba 56 Barium La 57 Lanthanum Hf 72 Hafnium Ta 73 Tantalum W 74 Tungstun Re 75 Rhenium Os 76 Osmium Ir 77 Iridium Pt 78 Platinum Au 79 Gold 80 Mercury Tl 81 Thallium Pb 82 Lead Bi 83 84 Bismuth Po Polonium Sr 38 Strontium Y 39 Yttrium Zr 40 Zirconium Nb 41 Niobium Mo 42 Molybdenum Tc 43 Technetium Ru 44 Ruthenium Rh 45 Rhodium Pd 46 Palladium Ag 47 Silver Cd 48 Cadmium In 49 Indium Sn 50 Tin Sc 21 Scandium Ti 22 Titanium V 23 Vanadium Cr 24 Chromium Mn 25 Manganese Fe 26 Iron Co 27 Cobalt Ni 28 Nickel Cu 29 Copper Zn 30 Zinc Ga 31 Gallium Al 13 Aluminum Mg 12 Magnesium Be 4 Berylium Si 14 Silicon P 15 Phosphorus S 16 Sulfur Se 34 Selenium As 33 Arsenic Ge 32 Germanium Sb 51 Antimony Te 52 Tellurium I 53 Iodine At 85 Astatine Ce 58 Cerium Th 90 Pa 91 Pr 59 Praseodymium Nd 60 Neodymium U 92 Np 93 Pm 61 Promethium Sm 62 Samarium Pu 94 Am 95 Eu 63 Europium Gd 64 Gadolinium Cm 96 Bk 97 Tb 65 Terbium Dy 66 Dysprosium Cf 98 Es 99 Ho 67 Holmium Er 68 Erbium Fm 100 Md 101 Tm 69 Thulium Yb 70 Ytterbium Lu 71 Lutetium No 102 Lr 103 Thorium Protactinium Uranium Neptunium Plutonium Americium Curium Berkelium Californium Einsteinium Fermium Mendelevium Nobelium Lawrencium © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4804 www.newpathlearning.com Elements & the Periodic Table Periodic Table of the Elements What are elements? ____________________ are the basic building blocks of matter. Each element is made up