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Flip Charts

Properties and States of Matter Flip Chart Set

Physical Science - Middle School

 
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\|xiFFIFGy00530tz] Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com 34-6921 Charts Charts Properties & states of Matter Properties & states of Matter Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2014 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Student Activity Guide Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to summarize key concepts and assess their understanding. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of science curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the Activity Guide. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: What is Matter? Elements & Compounds Mixtures & Solids What is Change of State? States of Matter: Solids States of Matter: Liquids States of Matter: Gases Changes of State Measuring Matter Vocabulary
50 60 70 80 90 100 40 30 20 10 Physical properties 1 - can be observed 2 - can be measured 3 - composition does not change Pure Cane SUGAR SUGAR 1 cup 1 2 salt sugar water NaClC12H22O11 H2O iron + oxygen rust © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4825 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. wood changes to smoke & ash Matter is anything that takes up space and has mass. Everything around us that we can see, smell or touch is made up of matter. Even many things that we cannot see, smell or touch are matter. Living and nonliving things are made of matter, including our clothing, the food we eat, and even the air we breathe. measuring matter fossil fuels Reactivity Flammability Chemical Properties of Matter A chemical property of matter describes the ability of the matter to react to other substances and change into different substances. Reactivity and flammability are both chemical properties. A chemical property of iron is that it reacts with oxygen in the air to form iron oxide, or rust. Wood is flammable, and if it is burned, it will change to ash and smoke. Another example is the flammability of fossil fuels, which release carbon dioxide gases when they are burned. Physical Properties of Matter Matter can be described as having physical and chemical properties. A physical property of matter is a property that can be observed or measured without changing the composition of the matter. Some examples of physical properties include color, texture, flexibility, density, mass, and magnetism. The states of matter, solid, liquid or gas, are also physical properties. Matter and Substances A substance is a type of matter that is pure and has a specific chemical makeup. For example, salt, sugar, and water are all substances with precise chemical compositions. Although there are numerous examples of pure substances, most of the matter around us is made up of many substances. Just think of all the substances and ingredients found in the foods we eat every day. What is Matter?
What is Matter? magnetite: wood: coffee: physical properties ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ physical properties ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ physical properties ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ chemical properties ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ chemical properties ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ chemical properties ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4825 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause and Review List properties of each of these types of matter. Identify whether they are chemical or physical properties.
Elements & Comp ounds © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4826 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Elements Elements are the most basic forms of matter. Aluminum, sulfur, iron and oxygen are all examples of elements. These are pure substances that cannot be broken down into simpler substances. Scientists have identified over 100 elements that are present in our universe. Each element is made up of one type of atom which determines its properties. The Periodic Table groups elements by their atomic number. Each element is represented by a chemical symbol. H 1 Hydrogen He 2 Helium Ne 10 Neon Ar 18 Argon Kr 36 Krypton Xe 54 Xenon Rn 86 Radon Br Hg 35 Bromine Cl 17 Chlorine F 9 Fluorine O 8 Oxygen N 7 Nitrogen C 6 Carbon B 5 Boron Li 3 Lithium Na 11 Sodium K 19 Potassium Ca 20 Calcium Rb 37 Rubidium Cs 55 Cesium Fr 87 Francium Ra 88 Radium Ac 89 Actinium Rf 104 Rutherfordium Db 105 Dubnium Ce 58 Cerium Th 90 Thorium Pa 91 Protactinium Pr 59 Praseodymium Nd 60 Neodymium U 92 Uranium Np 93 Neptunium Pm 61 Promethium Sm 62 Samarium Pu 94 Plutonium Am 95 Americium Eu 63 Europium Gd 64 Gadolinium Cm 96 Curium Bk 97 Berkelium Tb 65 Terbium Dy 66 Dysprosium Cf 98 Californium Es 99 Einsteinium Ho 67 Holmium Er 68 Erbium Fm 100 Fermium Md 101 Mendelevium Tm 69 Thulium Yb 70 Ytterbium Lu 71 Lutetium No 102 Nobelium Lr 103 Lawrencium Sg 106 Seaborgium Bh 107 Bohrium Hs 108 Hassium Mt 109 Meitnerium 110 Ununnilium 111 Unununium 112 Ununbium Uub 114 Ununquaternium Uuq Uuu Uun Ba 56 Barium La 57 Lanthanum Hf 72 Hafnium Ta 73 Tantalum W 74 Tungstun Re 75 Rhenium Os 76 Osmium Ir 77 Iridium Pt 78 Platinum Au 79 Gold 80 Mercury Tl 81 Thallium Pb 82 Lead Bi 83 84 Bismuth Po Polonium Sr 38 Strontium Y 39 Yttrium Zr 40 Zirconium Nb 41 Niobium Mo 42 Molybdenum Tc 43 Technetium Ru 44 Ruthenium Rh 45 Rhodium Pd 46 Palladium Ag 47 Silver Cd 48 Cadmium In 49 Indium Sn 50 Tin Sc 21 Scandium Ti 22 Titanium V 23 Vanadium Cr 24 Chromium Mn 25 Manganese Fe 26 Iron Co 27 Cobalt Ni 28 Nickel Cu 29 Copper Zn 30 Zinc Ga 31 Gallium Al 13 Aluminum Mg 12 Magnesium Be 4 Berylium Si 14 Silicon P 15 Phosphorus S 16 Sulfur Se 34 Selenium As 33 Arsenic Ge 32 Germanium Sb 51 Antimony Te 52 Tellurium I 53 Iodine At 85 Astatine solid state at room temperature liquid gas not found in nature Periodic Table of the Elements Compounds A compound is a substance made up of two or more different elements that are chemically combined in an exact ratio. The chemical formula of a compound tells you which elements make up the compound and how many atoms of each element are found in a single molecule of the compound. Water is a compound that has a ratio of two hydrogen atoms to every one oxygen atom. If this ratio is changed to two hydrogen atoms to every two oxygen atoms, a different compound is formed. This compound, hydrogen peroxide, has different properties than water. It is used as cleaning agent, and you would not want to drink it! 2:1 ratio 2:2 ratio H2O O H H O H O H H2O2 O2 Atoms Atoms are the building blocks of elements. They are the smallest component of an element that still has the properties of that element. Every element is made up of atoms that have a unique structure. For example, an oxygen atom contains eight protons and eight neutrons in its nucleus. Eight electrons circle the nucleus in an electron cloud. Molecules A molecule is the chemical combination of at least two atoms. Many elements occur in nature as molecules, not as single atoms. Oxygen typically occurs as a molecule made up of two chemically bonded atoms, and is written in a chemical formula as O 2. Oxygen atom electron proton neutron nucleus Periodic Table of the Elements
Pause and Review Complete the graphic organizer. Illustrate or list information about each item. Describe how they are related to each other. Elements & Comp ounds _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4826 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Atom Element Molecule Compound
Mixtures & Solutions Mixtures A mixture is the physical combination of two or more substances. Mixtures can be made of compounds and elements. The substances in a mixture are not chemically combined, and they are not found in an exact ratio. The ingredients keep their individual properties and can be separated. This nut mixture is called a heterogeneous mixture, because you can see the individual substances. In a homogeneous mixture, like paint, you cannot see the individual parts that make up the mixture. heterogeneous mixture homogeneous mixture heterogeneous mixture homogeneous mixture solute solvent water salt solute (salt) solvent (water) Colloids are a type of mixture in which particles are too small to see, but they are large enough to scatter light and be filtered. Milk, gelatin, whipped cream and many of the foods we eat are considered colloids. Suspensions & Colloids If the particles that are dispersed throughout a mixture are large enough to be seen and they scatter or block light, then the mixture is called a suspension. Eventually these particles will separate and settle out. For example, if you mix sand in a beaker of water, and then let it sit for a while, the sand particles will settle on the bottom of the container. suspension colloid Separating Mixtures Substances in a mixture are not chemically bonded together and therefore can be separated using a variety of techniques. Magnets can be used to separate a mixture of nails that are made of iron and aluminum. Some mixtures made up of liquids and solids can be separated using filters. Distillation is a process used to separate substances that have different boiling points, like water and salt. A centrifuge is a machine that spins mixtures at high speeds. It can be used to separate substances by their densities. Star t Stop 0.0 0 magnet centrifuge filter distillation Solutions A solution looks like a single substance, but it is actually a homogeneous mixture made up of two or more evenly distributed substances. For example, when salt is mixed with water, the salt particles dissolve, or mix evenly, with the water particles. The salt, which is the substance that dissolved, is called the solute. The water, which caused the salt to dissolve, is called the solvent. Solutions can be liquids like anti-freeze, or gases like the air we breathe, or even solids, like brass. The concentration of a solution is the amount of solute in a given amount of solvent. Concentrations are often measured in grams per milliliter. A concentrated solution has more solute in it than a dilute solution. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4827 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. heterogeneous mixture homogeneous mixture concentrated dilute sand
Mixtures & Solutions Denition Element Compound Mixture Solution Suspension Colloid Examples © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4827 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Pause and Review Fill out the table below with definitions and examples. ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________
What is Change of State? Change of State A change of state is when matter changes its physical form, such as when a solid melts to form a liquid, or when a liquid is heated to form a gas. Changes of state are physical, not chemical, changes. The matter itself does not change its chemical composition. solid liquid gas liquid Physical States & Th ermal Energy The physical state of matter is related to the thermal energy of the particles and the amount of movement of the particles. Matter that is solid has the least amount of thermal energy and the particles have very little movement. Liquids have more thermal energy and the particles exhibit more movement. Gases contain the most thermal energy and the particles are in constant motion. solid least most thermal energy liquid gas Changes of state occur when matter gains or loses thermal energy. For example, a liquid can gain thermal energy when it is heated. The particles move faster, and the liquid matter changes to a gas. If a liquid is cooled, it loses energy and the particles slow down. The liquid then changes to a solid. Changes that occur when energy is added to matter are called endothermic , and changes that occur when energy is removed or lost are called exothermic . exothermic endothermic energy added energy lost © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4828 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
CAUSE Solid Liquid EFFECT Liquid Gas Liquid Solid E Matter can change from one state to another. Write the cause and effect for each example of matter changing states. Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. Change in Matter What is Change of State? Pause and Review Matter can change from one state to another. Write the cause and effect of each example of matter changing states. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4828 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
States of Matter: Solids States of Matter Matter can exist in three different physical forms—solid, liquid or gas. We are all familiar with the forms of water—ice, liquid water and steam. These different forms are called the states of matter. The particles within matter interact with each other in different ways and determine if the matter is a solid, liquid or gas. 1 cup 1 2 11 solid liquid gas ice water steam type of solid examples crystalline amorphous salt, quartz glass, rubber regular, repeated pa ern precise random not precise particle arrangement melting point type of solid examples crystalline amorphous salt, quartz glass, rubber regular, repeated pa ern precise random not precise particle arrangement melting point type of solid examples crystalline amorphous salt, quartz glass, rubber regular, repeated pa ern precise random not precise particle arrangement melting point Solids Solid matter has a definite shape and volume . Think about a bowling ball. You can pick it up, move it and drop it, and the shape always remains the same. The ball is a solid . The particles that make up a solid are packed tightly together in a fixed position. The particles themselves vibrate, but they do not move out of position. Crystalline & Am orphous Solids Solids can be classified as crystalline or amorphous . In crystalline solids , such as quartz or salt, the particles have a regular repeated pattern and a definite geometric shape . When crystalline solids are heated, they have a precise melting point . Amorphous solids, such as glass and rubber, are made up of particles that are arranged randomly , and they do not have a precise melting point. amorphous solid crystalline solid © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4829 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
type of solid examples crystalline amorphous salt, quartz glass, rubber regular, repeated pa ern precise random not precise particle arrangement melting point type of solid examples crystalline amorphous salt, quartz glass, rubber regular, repeated pa ern precise random not precise particle arrangement melting point Pause and Review Identify and describe the three states of matter. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4829 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. States of Matter: Solids type of solid examples crystalline amorphous salt, quartz glass, rubber regular, repeated pa ern precise random not precise particle arrangement melting point Complete the chart for types of solids. ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________
Sweet Honey GLUE viscosity ow glue honey oil milk water high low slow fast States of Matter: Liquids Liquids Liquid matter can change its shape, but it always has a definite volume. For example, if you pour 200 ml of milk from a carton into a measuring cup and an equal amount into a flask, the shape of the liquid will be different in the two containers, but the volume will stay the same. 1 cup 1 2 200 mL Similar to a solid, the particles in a liquid are packed closely together. However, unlike a solid, the particles in a liquid can slide past each other. This sliding motion allows a liquid to flow, or be fluid, and take on the shape of its container. Surface Tension Many liquids, such as water, form droplets. These droplets are caused by surface tension, which occurs when the molecules at the surface of the liquid form a strong attraction to each other and to the water molecules below them. This attraction can form a layer on the surface of the liquid. 1 cup 1 2 200 mL droplet surface surface tension Surface tension is what allows lightweight insects to actually walk across the surface of a pond. The surface tension of different liquids varies. For example, alcohol has a lower surface tension than water. Viscosity Viscosity is a property of liquids. Basically, viscosity means a liquid’s resistance to flow. Liquids with higher viscosity flow more slowly, like honey. Liquids with lower viscosity flow more quickly, like water. Shown are some examples of liquids and their relative viscosities. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4830 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. surface tension droplet surface
Liquids Solids Pause and Review Compare and contrast liquids and solids in the Venn Diagram below. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4830 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. States of Matter: Liquids
States of Matter: Gases © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4831 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Gases Gas particles move in all directions, and are only limited by the container they are in. Unlike solids and liquids, gas particles have a lot of empty space between them. Gases can change both shape and volume. Scientists discovered that the temperature, volume and pressure of a gas are all related. Changing one of these factors, affects the other factors. Boyle’s Law Robert Boyle was a scientist that studied gases and the relationship between pressure and volume. Boyle’s law states that, for a gas that is at a constant temperature, the volume is inversely related to the pressure. Charles’s Law In the late 1700s a scientist and inventor named Jacques Charles helped create the first hydrogen- filled balloons. He discovered that the volume of a gas, such as hydrogen, will increase as the temperature of the gas is increased. Charles’s Law states that, for a fixed amount of gas at a constant pressure, the volume will change in direct proportion to a change in temperature. For instance, in a hot air balloon, as the gas inside the balloon is heated and the temperature increases, the volume of the gas expands, and the balloon gets larger. volume (mL) constant temperature pressure (kPa) 0 volume = 10,000 mL pressure = 14 kPa volume = 5,000 mL pressure = 28 kPa volume (mL) constant temperature pressure (kPa) 0 volume = 10,000 mL pressure = 14 kPa volume = 5,000 mL pressure = 28 kPa higher pressure lower pressure increase in volume An example of Boyle’s Law in action is the increasing volume of bubbles as they rise from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure. A scuba diver at the bottom of the ocean releases air bubbles. As the bubbles rise, the pressure inside the bubbles decreases. This decrease in pressure results in an increase in volume within the air bubbles, and the bubbles get larger. temperature (K) 0 constant pressure volume (mL) volume is directly related to temperature Jacques Charles Robert Boyle volume is inversely related to pressure
______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ (mL) constant temperature temperature (K) 0 constant pressure volume (mL) _________________________ Law _________________________ Law Pause and Review Which gas law does the graph represent - Boyle’s Law or Charles’s Law? Briefly explain the law and the relationships between gas pressure, volume and temperature. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4831 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. States of Matter: Gases ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ volume (mL) constant temperature pressure (kPa) 0 temperature (K) 0 constant pressure volume (mL)
Changes of State Melting Melting is the process of changing from a solid to a liquid state. When thermal energy is added to a solid, the temperature rises and the particles vibrate faster and faster. The particles reach a point when they move out of their fixed positions and the matter becomes a liquid. The temperature at which the solid becomes a liquid is called the melting point. Different materials have different melting points. Freezing Freezing is the process of changing from a liquid to a solid state. It is the opposite process of melting. When thermal energy is removed or lost from a liquid, the temperature becomes cooler and the particles move more slowly. When the particles reach a point when they are no longer moving and are in fixed positions, the matter becomes a solid. The temperature at which the liquid becomes a solid is called the freezing point, which is actually the same temperature as the melting point. solid energy Vaporization Vaporization is the process of changing from a liquid to a gas. There are two types of vaporization, evaporation and boiling. Evaporation occurs when particles on the surface of a liquid are moving fast enough to escape into the air as gas. Boiling occurs when the particles throughout a liquid are moving fast enough to become gas. Water molecules that are heated will vaporize and form bubbles that rise to the surface. The boiling point is the temperature at which a liquid begins to boil. It‘s different for different materials. The molecular structure of a substance determines how much energy is needed for it to change from a liquid to gas. Air pressure also affects the boiling point. When the air pressure surrounding the liquid is higher, more energy is needed for the particles to break free and change to gas. If the air pressure is lower, then less energy is required, and the liquid will boil at a lower temperature. Condensation Condensation is the process of changing from a gas to a liquid. It is the opposite process of vaporization. An example of condensation is when we see water droplets form on the surface of a cold glass. When the air around the glass is cooled, the particles of water vapor in the air move more slowly. The particles begin clumping due to molecular attraction, and the gas changes to liquid water droplets. The temperature at which a gas becomes a liquid is called its condensation point, and it is the same temperature as its boiling point. dry ice (CO 2) carbon dioxide gas warm air fog Sublimation Sublimation is a process that occurs when a material changes from a solid directly into a gas. An example is dry ice, which is extremely cold and is composed of carbon dioxide. When dry ice is removed from a freezer, it acquires thermal energy from the warm air surrounding it, and the solid changes directly to a gas. The cold gas causes water vapor in the air to condense and form fog. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4832 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. material melting point (ºC) iron aluminum tin water 1,538 660 232 0 gas liquid boiling point 100ºC evaporation boiling water molecules gas water molecules liquid water droplets water droplets
Label each of the processes that occur when water changes state. Write down the correct corresponding temperatures that indicate when these changes occur. liquid gas _____ºC _____ºC solid Pause and Review Label each of the processes that occur when water changes state. Write down the correct corresponding temperatures that indicate when these changes occur. Define boiling point, melting point and freezing point. What is the relationship between them? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4832 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Changes of State
Measuring Matter International System of Units Scientists use the International System of Units, abbreviated SI units, for measuring matter. The SI unit for mass is a kilogram and for length is a meter. When measuring volume, the liter is the most commonly used unit. 50 60 70 80 90 100 40 30 20 10 100 mL mass - kilogram length - meter volume - liter Prex Kilo One thousand (103) Hecto One hundred (102) Deca Ten (101) Deci One-tenth (10-1) Centi One-hundredth (10-2) Milli One-thousandth (10-3) Micro One-ten thousandth (10-4) Factor 1 meter 1 centimeter Volume Volume is the amount of space that matter occupies. The volume of liquids and gases are typically measured in liters and milliliters. Solids are often measured in cubic centimeters. Density Matter can also be described by measuring its density. Density is the mass of an object in a given volume. To calculate density, divide an object’s mass by its volume. The unit for density is grams per cubic centimeter (g/cm3). To find the volume of an irregularly shaped object, such as a rock, scientists sometimes submerge the object in water to see how much water is displaced. The rise in the water level indicates the volume of the rock. 25 cm 25 cm x 4 cm x 45 cm = 4,500 cm3 4 cm 45 cm 25 cm 25 cm x 4 cm x 45 cm = 4,500 cm3 4 cm 45 cm amount displaced irregular shape = volume 500.00 g 1500.00 g mass = 500 g volume = 200 cm3 density = 2.5 g/cm3 density = 7.5 g/cm3 mass = 1,500 g volume = 200 cm3 500.00 g 1500.00 g mass = 500 g volume = 200 cm3 density = 2.5 g/cm3 density = 7.5 g/cm3 mass = 1,500 g volume = 200 cm3 For example, a piece of aluminum with a mass of 500 g and volume of 200 cm3 has a density of 2.5 g/cm3. A piece of iron with the same volume has a mass of 1,500 g. Iron’s density is 7.5 g/cm3. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4833 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Prefixes are used to indicate smaller or larger units. For example a centimeter is one- hundredth of the length of a meter. SI units enable scientists to measure matter and share data in a consistent and accurate way. Mass and Weight An object’s mass refers to