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Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences

English Language Arts, Grade 8

 
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A simple sentence is usually short. It contains a subject and a verb. The subject is understood in an imperative sentence such as: Let’s take the subway. A complex sentence has an independent clause that could stand alone as a sentence (shown in orange below). It also has at least one subordinate (less important) clause (shown in blue below). The subordinate clause cannot stand on its own. When the subordinate clause comes at the start of the complex sentence, it is often followed by a comma. When the subordinate clause comes at the end of the complex sentence, there is no comma. If you’re going skiing, take me along. Take me along if you’re going skiing. When you hear the buzzer, please take the chicken out of the oven. Please take the chicken out of the oven when you hear the buzzer. As a result of the accident, my mom had to buy a new car. My mom had to buy a new car as a result of the accident. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses (sentences) joined together with a semicolon (;) or joined by a comma and a conjunction (and, but, or, for, so yet, nor ). A semicolon joins two sentences that are closely related. My wedding anniversary is July 16; the day we got married it was incredibly hot and muggy. Notice that everything before the semicolon forms a complete sentence, and everything after the semicolon forms a complete sentence. The whole thing is a compound sentence. Marla Jamison is currently serving her third term in Congress, and Walt Reardon is serving his second term. Notice that everything before the comma forms a complete sentence, and everything after the conjunction (and) forms a complete sentence. The whole thing is a compound sentence. Sam is riding a horse. Myra walks to the bus stop. BUS STOP AD1B5 76 Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4078
Identify each sentence as simple (S), compound (C), or complex (X). _____ 1. Sue noticed the black car leave the parking lot as she entered the building. _____ 2. Don’t lose your credit card; it is as valuable as cash! _____ 3. You must stay in school, or you must get a job. _____ 4. Is there a Tracker’s store in our area? _____ 5. We emerged from the barn after the tornado had passed. _____ 6. If you’d like to join the club, visit our web site. _____ 7. Jason pulled the toddler away from the busy road. _____ 8. Turn left onto Hedgehog Lane. _____ 9. Before the discovery of antibiotics, people frequently died of infection. _____ 10. Attendance was high, so the carnival stayed an additional day. _____ 11. Glenn will call you for an interview when an opening occurs. _____ 12. We tiptoed into the theater because we arrived so late. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * 0 # Arrival 10:00 am Speed Turn right on Hedgehog Lane 35 mph AD1B5 76 Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4078
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