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Punctuation: Apostrophes & Quotation Marks

English Language Arts, Grade 5

 
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Apostrophes are used in contractions and possessives. In contractions, the apostrophe takes the place of the missing letters. In this example, the apostrophe is used instead of the no in the word cannot: We can’t go to the campground. In possessives, the apostrophe goes before or after the s to show ownership. When the apostrophe goes before the s, it shows that a singular noun owns the object. Is this Stephanie’s hat? (One person Stephanie owns the hat.) When the apostrophe goes after the s, it shows that a plural noun owns the object. The Jacobsons’ horse is in the third stall in the barn. (A couple owns the horse.) Quotation marks look like double apostrophes. Quotation marks are used around a speaker’s exact words, when material is quoted word-for-word, and to enclose the titles of texts that are part of a larger work, poems, and songs. Speaker’s exact words: Hassan said, “Let’s travel by plane instead of train.” A word-for-word quote: In From the Earth to the Moon Jules Verne wrote, “How many things have been denied one day, only to become realities the next!” To enclose the titles of songs, poems, and texts that are part of a larger work: My favorite song is, “You are My Sunshine.” Farrah memorized Shel Silverstein’s poem, “Tell Me.” His article, “Are Grey Wolves Making a Comeback?” appeared in the February 2016 edition of World Conservationist . (an article in a magazine) Beatrix Potter wrote the short story, “Peter Rabbit.” (Short stories are published in magazines or collected in a book.) Please read the third chapter, “Caring for Exotic Pets,” before Friday. (a chapter of a nonfiction book) Punctuation: Apostrophes & Quotation Marks Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4054
Insert apostrophes and quotation marks as needed. 1. Leila said, Lets get going, or well be late to the show! 2. Have you read Robert Frosts poem, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening? 3. Ben wrote High Five Recycling, an article that appeared in a recent edition of Highlights . 4. Youre supposed to read the fable, The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs, before Friday. 5. Tyson asked, Didnt you get that book from the library? 6. Im finding it hard to read the fifth chapter, How to Divide Fractions. 7. My moms favorite song is Simon and Garfunkels The Sound of Silence. 8. Beatrix Potters short story, The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck, is one of her best. 9. Were going to the party at the Ricardos house on Elmwood Avenue. 10. Wheres your key to the apartment? I asked Frank. 11. That blue car in the third row isnt the Mortons car, said Sylvia. 12. Its not my fault you didnt do your homework. LIBRARY Punctuation: Apostrophes & Quotation Marks Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4054
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