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Flip Charts

PARTS OF SPEECH Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 4

 
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32-4002 u|xhJBBFEy03795tz] Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A Verbs Adjectives Parts of Speech Vocabulary: Adjectives and Adverbs Modifiers–Adjectives Types of Nouns Types of Pronouns Adverbs Prepositions, Conjunctions & Interjections Regular and Irregular Verbs Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
infinitive past participle as in to send am sending I am sending him an email. to play is playing The cat is playing with the feather. to smile are smiling The children are smiling. to ride will be riding We will be riding the rollercoaster. Regular & Irregular Verbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4083 A verb is the action or “being” part of a sentence. The verb tenses tells you when the action occurs: past, present, or future. The infinitive is the word to plus the verb: to walk; to eat; to sleep. Regular verbs form their past tenses by adding a –d or –ed to the infinitive; if the infinitive ends in y, it may change to i before the ed. infinitive past present future to lock locked lock will lock to hurry hurried hurry will hurry Irregular verbs form their past tenses in an unusual way. Only the past tense is affected. Unfortunately irregular verbs are common; they have to be memorized. There is no logical way to tell if a verb is regular or irregular by looking at the infinitive. infinitive past present future to drive drove drive will drive to slide slid slide will slide In addition, there are two kinds of verb participles—past and present. Past participles of irregular verbs are irregular, too. Past participles follow the helping verbs has , have , or had : infinitive past participle as in to order has ordered Everyone at that table has ordered a meal. to see have seen I have already seen that movie. to swim had swum Jay had swum in the lake. Present participles end in –ing and follow the helping verbs that are forms of to be, such as am , is , are , and will be :
Past tense Past Participle Present tense Present Participle Future tense ex. shrank had shrunk shrink speak jump choose ride write freeze search wear go give sit throw is shrinking will shrink 35 flavors! specials today - bubblegum toffee pumpkin Regular & Irregular Verbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4083 Complete the chart. You may use a dictionary if necessary.
A noun is a person, place or thing. An adjective is a word that tells more about a noun. It describes a noun. Adding adjectives to your writing makes it more vivid and interesting. When you read, it is important that you form pictures in your mind based on the words in the story. Adjectives are what help you to form the pictures. Comparing with Adjectives Some adjectives compare nouns. There are two ways that these adjectives are formed. When you compare 2 things, you use the word more or less, or you add –er to the end of the adjective. When you compare 3 or more things, you use the word most or least, or you add –est to the end of the adjective. Compare these sentences: The boy sat. Can you picture that? Not really. There’s not enough detail. The boy sat on the musty old couch. The words musty and old are adjectives. You wrinkle your nose as you picture him sitting on that yucky couch. Jazz is more popular than rock ‘n roll. Randy is shorter than Nicole. Buy the vase that is the least expensive. This is the biggest tree in my neighborhood. Adjectives Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4026
TOYS AD1B5 76 Circle the adjective(s) in each sentence. On the line, write which noun(s) the adjective(s) describe(s). The mean usher grabbed my ticket and threw it in the trash. _________ 1. An ugly troll jumped out and shook his tiny fist at Jenna. ______________________________ 2. Which store is the closest to us? ______________________________ 3. Sheila rubbed her sore elbow and then wiped her teary eyes. ______________________________ 4. We watched the muddy brown water race under the bridge. ______________________________ 5. Check out Dave’s fancy new car! ______________________________ 6. These gloves are more attractive than that pair. ______________________________ 7. I’ve misplaced my brown sunglasses. ______________________________ 8. The dog’s fur was dirty and matted. ______________________________ usher Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4026 Adjectives
Every sentence contains two parts of speech: a noun or pronoun and a verb. Nouns are people, places, and things. They can be the subject of a sentence. man forest dessert Proper nouns are specific people, places, or things. They can be the subject of a sentence. Joel Colorado Hershey’s ice cream Pronouns take the place of nouns. They can be the subject of a sentence. he, she, they, we, you, I Verbs show action or existence. A verb must match the subject of the sentence. Here are some action verbs: cry, sit, leap Here are some being verbs: am, was, were, will be, is There are three main verb tenses: past, present, and future. The tense tells when the action takes place. The Subject and Verb Must Agree The subject of a sentence is the person, place, thing, or idea that the sentence is about. It can be a noun, a proper noun, or a pronoun. A singular subject has a singular verb. Past tense: Lisa giggled at the cat. Present tense: Lisa giggles at the cat. Future tense: Lisa will giggle at the cat. A plural subject has a plural verb. Past tense: The cows walked into the barn. Present tense: The cows walk into the barn. Future tense: The cows will walk into the barn. NOTE: when the subject is singular, the present-tense verb usually ends in s. When the subject is plural, the present-tense verb usually does NOT end in s. The newborn lamb stands on wobbly legs. The newborn lambs stand on wobbly legs. COLORADO Parts of Speech Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4053
Circle the sentence’s subject. Underline the verb. 1. Six deer ran through the field. 2. The sun shines brightly. 3. Mom will make dinner soon. 4. She brushes her hair out of her eyes. 5. His dog will eat anything! 6. Quietly Melissa tiptoes down the hall. 7. Both boys race past the finish line. 8. My brother waved goodbye to me. 9. Is her phone over there? 10. I will ride roller coasters tomorrow! Underline the sentence’s subject. Circle the correct present-tense verb form. 11. Andy write /writes a column for the school newspaper. 12. They don’t/doesn’t know where the keys are. 13. You peek/peeks under the bed. 14. We plan/plans to open a coffee shop in May. 15. He eagerly open/opens the gift. 16. The baby play/plays with the toy. SAM M2 M2 C 1 GHI PQRS Parts of Speech Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4053
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (person, place, or thing). It can come before or after the noun. It can tell which one, what kind, or how many. There are also identifier adjectives: this, that, these, and those. An adverb is a word that describes a verb (action word). It can come before or after the verb. An adverb tells when, where, how, and to what extent the action occurs. First, locate the nouns. Then, find the adjectives in these sentences: A beautiful painting hung over her massive stone fireplace. Nouns: painting and fireplace Adjectives: beautiful (describes painting); stone and massive (describe fireplace) When the action occurs: She will talk tomorrow. Where the action occurs: He cooks here. How the action occurs: She sews quickly. To what extent the action occurs: He walks more slowly than the others. Many, but not all, adverbs end in –ly. She smiled sweetly. He easily pushed the cart. The mouse’s door was so tiny I couldn’t even fit my right hand through it. Nouns: door and hand Adjectives: tiny (describes door); right (describes hand) Vocabulary: Adjectives & Adverbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4045
Underline the noun(s). Circle the adjective(s) that describe it. Draw a box around the verb(s). Circle the adverb(s) that describe it. 1. A cranky old woman shuffled out of the cobblestone cottage. 2. He slammed the door of a battered blue truck. 3. The tearful boy told me that he’d lost his spotted puppy. 4. Put those gifts on that table. 5. The raging fire engulfed three trees. 6. From its tall wooden perch, a colorful parrot screeched. 7. I stared enviously at Tess’s large box of chocolate bars. 8. Yesterday Joe played in a soccer tournament. 9. She hid under the bridge. 10. Today Brady jumped over a chair. 11. Bianca whispered more quietly than Joella did. 12. Although she stood over the smashed cookie jar, my little sister looked at me innocently. Vocabulary: Adjectives & Adverbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4045
Modifiers–Adjectives Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4072 An adjective is a word that modifies, or tells about, a noun or pronoun. I prefer the blue T-shirt to the green one. A proper adjective is formed from a proper noun and always capitalized. Is that the German flag or the Austrian flag? (German is based on Germany and Austrian is based on Austria.) A compound adjective is when two or more words are used as a descriptive phrase directly in front of the noun it modifies. The words must be used together to modify the noun. Compound adjectives are always hyphenated. She signed a six-month lease for the apartment. Note: It’s not a six lease, and it’s not a month lease; it’s a six-month lease. Since you need both words together to describe the noun lease , six month is hyphenated. She signed an apartment lease for six months. (There’s no hyphen because the words come after the noun lease .) A predicate adjective always comes after the noun it describes. It always follows a linking verb. The linking verbs are forms of the verb to be (is, are, was, were, etc.) Other common linking verbs are appear, become, feel, grow, keep, look, prove, remain, seem, smell, sound, stay, taste, and turn . The linking verbs are underlined in the examples below: The baby appears hungry. (hungry describes the baby) We were too tired to argue. (tired describes the pronoun we) Her song sounds beautiful. (beautiful describes the song) A demonstrative adjective is a word such as this, that, these, and those used to describe nouns. Did Sally like that movie or this one? (that and this both describe movies) Are these the socks you’re looking for? (these describe the socks) LEASE
Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4072 Underline the adjective in each sentence. Circle the noun or pronoun it describes. Identify the type of adjective it is by writing its code on the line. A = adjective PR = proper adjective C = compound adjective PA = predicate adjective D = demonstrative adjective _____ 1. Greg wants Swiss cheese on his sub. _____ 2. These are the raspberry bushes I have for sale. _____ 3. The air in the room smelled stale. _____ 4. A well known celebrity stepped out of the limosuine. _____ 5. A homeless man pushed a shopping cart full of empty bottles. _____ 6. With time and rest the boy grew stronger. _____ 7. Would you like French fries with your order? _____ 8. Dawn is the blonde woman with the large sunglasses. _____ 9. Look at those clouds! We’d better take cover. _____ 10. Let’s order Chinese takeout for dinner. _____ 11. This drink tastes weird; I’m going to toss it out. _____ 12. He cried out when he discovered that the top-secret plans had been stolen from the safe. PR Modifiers–Adjectives
There are five types of nouns. Singular noun: names one person, place, or thing The lifeguard rescued the boy. Plural noun: names two or more people, places, or things The Oberts adopted twins last week. The recipe calls for three eggs. He visited four national parks during his trip. Proper noun: names a specific person, place, or thing and is always capitalized Jack Grady is in Mrs. Bronson’s eighth grade homeroom. Did you visit Atlantic City last weekend? My favorite candy is Yumbo Pops. Collective noun: names a group; because collective nouns are a single entity, they take a singular verb A herd of deer was grazing in the field. Possessive noun: shows ownership; you can often spot this as two nouns next to each other with the first owning the second. Notice that a possessive noun always includes an apostrophe. The bear’s front leg was injured. (the leg belongs to the bear) The Jacobsons’ daughter will graduate from high school this year. (the daughter belongs to the Jacobsons) A dilapidated barn sagged in the meadow. The team runs onto the field. Types of Nouns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4073
___________ 9. A flock of geese crossed the road in front of us. ___________ 5. There were six ripe tomatoes on the plant. ___________ 1. Did you buy the tickets to the musical? ___________ 2. The school of fish quickly changed direction. ___________ 3. I think that’s Albert’s jacket on the chair. ___________ 4. We camped in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in July. ___________ 7. Where are the textbooks I left on the table? ___________ 6. The monitor’s cable is unplugged. ___________ 8. The Barkers’ house burned down last night. ___________ 11. On Saturday night they’re having dinner at the Blue River Inn. ___________ 10. The dogs’ collars were caught on the fencing. ___________ 12. The audience claps loudly at the end of the performance. Underline the nouns in each sentence. Identify the type of noun by writing its code on the line. There may be more than one noun in each sentence. PL = Plural S = Singular PO = Possessive C = Collective PR = Proper PL, S Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4073 Types of Nouns
Types of Pronouns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4074 A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. A nominative case pronoun can be the subject of a sentence: I, you, he, she, we, they, and it. They just bought a new car! Objective case pronouns cannot be the subject of a sentence: me, him, her, them, and us. Did you try to text me? The pronoun you is unique because it can serve as the subject or object in a sentence. A possessive pronoun shows ownership. Never put an apostrophe in a possessive pronoun. Are these books hers? The cat scratched its ear. A reflexive pronoun ends with “self” or “ selves”: yourself, himself, herself, myself, itself, ourselves, and themselves. Always name the person before you refer back to him or her with a reflexive pronoun. A reflexive pronoun can never be the subject of a sentence. Right: Terry painted the deck all by himself. (Himself refers back to Terry.) Wrong: Dom and myself will chair the committee. (A reflexive pronoun can’t be a subject.) An indefinite pronoun refers to a nonspecific person or thing: somebody, nobody, anybody, everybody, someone, no one, anyone, and everyone. These pronouns take a singular verb. Everybody passed the test. No one wants to play ball in the rain. Pronoun Sticky Wickets: Little Words Causing Big Trouble Writers often mix up the use of I and me. To determine which to use, substitute the pronoun we . When we works, I is correct. When we doesn’t work, me is correct. Bree and ? went to the fair. “We” works in this sentence. Thus, it should be: Bree and I went to the fair. The envelope was addressed to Georgio, Martino, and ?. “We” doesn’t work in this sentence. Thus, it should be: The envelope was addressed to Georgio, Martino, and me. When a pronoun follows any form of the verb to be (is, was, were, etc.), use the nominative case, as in: The last runners to cross the finish line were Jorge and I. ELA Test 99% M2 M2 C 1 GHI PQRS AD1B5 76 Georgio, Martino & Sal
Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4074 Types of Pronouns 7. _______________ voted to have a pizza party except for Fernando. Everyone, Someone, Anyone Read each sentence. Then, choose the correct pronoun for each blank. 1. I’m sure that Sarah, Todd, and _______________ are prepared to take the science exam. I, me, myself 2. Does the robot move _________ mouth when _________ speaking? its, it’s, its’ its, it’s, its’ 3. The first- and second-place ribbons went to Rob and _______________ . I, me, myself 4. Nona, a famous circus elephant, appeared as _______________ in the TV show. she, her, herself 5. After the game, Rico and _______________ went to get hamburgers. I, me, myself 6. The only person left in the room was _______________ . I, me, myself 9. Did she want Cecilia and _______________ to sing the duet? I, me, myself 8. In raising children, parents work ___________________ out of a job. their, them, themselves 11. Did ______________ finish the ice cream by ________________? you, your, yourself you, your, yourself 10. Oddly, when Fred answered the door, _________________ was there. someone, no one, anyone 12. When I awoke, I found _______________ locked in an old tool shed. I, me, myself 2nd
An adverb is a word that usually modifies (describes) a verb. An adverb tells when, where, how, and to what extent the action occurs. An adverb sometimes modifies an adjective or another adverb. My cousin is the most beautiful girl in her class. (Beautiful is an adjective modifying the noun girl; most is the adverb modifying beautiful.) The comparative form of an adverb uses the word more as in more rapidly. Use this form to compare two people or things. James swam more rapidly than Morgan. The superlative form of an adverb uses the word most as in most quietly. Use this form to compare three or more people or things. In the choir, Timothy sang the most quietly. Irregular Adverb Forms Memorize these as they don’t follow the rules. Frequency and Time Adverbs That Don’t End in -ly These are frequency adverbs: always, often, sometimes, seldom, and never. These are time adverbs: now, soon, today, tomorrow, yesterday, then, and later. Adverbs that do not end in -ly form the comparative by adding –er to the word. I found that winning this match was harder than the previous one. Adverbs that do not end in –ly form the superlative by adding –est to the word. Of all the girls on the bowling team, Janelle arrived the latest. Many adverbs end with –ly: deliberately, fortunately, innocently, usually, wearily He held the stack of boxes awkwardly. (Awkwardly tells how he is holding the boxes.) The bench had been recently painted. (Recently is an adverb describing when the bench was painted.) Adverb Comparative Form Superlative Form (they end in st) badly worse worst little less least many, much more most well better best Adverbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4079
Circle the adverb(s) in each sentence. Underline the word(s) that it modifies. 1. The bomb seriously wounded the soldier’s leg. 2. She brushed past the boy, rudely bumping his shoulder. 3. My parents never received my report card. 4. The noise in the bushes made Jackson crawl more hurriedly. 5. Miles says that splitting wood is easier than shoveling snow. 6. To shorten your speech, remove the two least important points. 7. He did worse in the one-mile run than Henry did. 8. That is the most heartless thing I’ve ever heard anyone say! 9. Yesterday Alex was coughing noisily. 10. Of the team members, Sheila drove the farthest. 11. Bryan held his breath the longest. 12. We always order a pizza on Friday nights. Adverbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4079
A preposition is a short word that connects a noun, pronoun, or other words in a sentence. It tells where something is or where it is going or when something happens. The prepositions are underlined in the examples below. The dishes are in the cabinet above the dishwasher. Sam will go with you to the beach. The baby crawled to her father. An interjection is a short word