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Flip Charts

SPELLING RULES Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 3

 
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32-3002 u|xhJBBFEy03796qzZ Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A Contractions Root Words, Prefixes, Suffixes Spelling: Plurals and Possessives Homophones Roots Prefixes and Suffixes Spelling Patterns Spelling Homonyms & Odd Plurals Spelling Guidelines Structural Analysis Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
A contraction is one word. It is made by putting together two words. One or more letters are missing from the second word. An apostrophe takes the place of the missing letters. did + not = didn’t Notice that the apostrophe takes the place of the o in not. they + are = they’re An apostrophe takes the place of the a in are. Here are some contractions in which two letters are missing: they + will = they’ll An apostrophe takes the place of the wi in will. you + have = you’ve An apostrophe takes the place of the ha in have. cannot = can’t An apostrophe takes the place of the no. The contraction ’s can stand for has or is. You can tell which it is by the context. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen Donna. (It has been a long time since I’ve seen Donna.) There’s a ship in the port. (There is a ship in the port.) The contraction for will not is strange. It is the only one where the first word changes, too. will + not = won’t Never forget to use the apostrophe. If you do, the contraction may look like a different word, as in: shell instead of she’ll were instead of we’re Ill instead of I’ll Contractions Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4015
Write the contraction for each pair of words. you’re 1. you are = _________________ 2. will not = _________________ 3. I have = _________________ 4. should not = _________________ 5. she is = _________________ 6. cannot = _________________ 7. they are = _________________ 8. he will = _________________ 9. would have = _________________ 10. there has = _________________ 11. you will = _________________ 12. we are = _________________ we are they are you are he will she is Contractions Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4015
A root word is a word before a prefix or a suffix is added to it. Sometimes root words are called base words. A prefix is a group of letters added to the start of a root word that change its meaning. A suffix is a group of letters added to the end of a root word that change its meaning. In the word incorrect, the root word is correct. The prefix in- means not. This equation is incorrect: 4 x 8 = 34. In the word collectible, the root word is collect. The suffixes -ible or -able added to a word means able to be. A collectible is an item that can be collected, such as comic books. In the word worker, the base word is work. The suffix -er added to the word means a person who. gardener means a person who gardens Be careful with that dish! It’s breakable. (The dish would be easy to break.) In the word nonstick, the root word is stick. The prefix is non-, which means not. Use this nonstick frying pan. The prefix mis- means not. Emily misspoke. (Emily did not say the right thing.) reader means a person who reads Root Words, Prefixes & Suffixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4034
Add the prefix or suffix to each root word. Write the new word on the line. 1. sell + er = _____________________ 2. mis + understood = _____________________ 3. comfort + able = _____________________ 4. in + ability = _____________________ 5. non + fat = _____________________ 6. in + direct = _____________________ 7. build + er = _____________________ 8. response + ible = _____________________ 9. drive + er = _____________________ 10. non + profit = _____________________ 11. mis + heard = _____________________ 12. in + divide + ible = _______________________ (be careful—the de is dropped and a new letter is added) TAXI Root Words, Prefixes & Suffixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4034
Plurals A plural shows that there is more than one noun. Usually you just add an s to the end of the noun. book + s = books When the noun ends in a consonant-y, drop the y and add ies. baby + s = babies When the noun ends in ch, o, s, sh, or x, you add es to the end of the noun. bench + es = benches tomato + es = tomatoes kiss + es = kisses dish + es = dishes fox + es = foxes Possessives A possessive shows that someone owns something. Usually when there are two nouns in a row, the first one owns the second. To show possession add an apostrophe s to the end of the first noun, like this: ’s. Jerry’s tablet the dog’s collar If the noun is plural, the apostrophe goes AFTER the s. the girls’ house (There is one house that belongs to two girls.) Some plurals are weird. Luckily there are only a few of these. More than one person is people. More than one goose is geese. the Gildarrys’ car (The car belongs to two people with the same last name. You don’t change the spelling of a person’s last name when you make it plural.) three boys’ comic books (Each of the boys owns at least one comic book.) The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Digger Spelling: Plurals & Possessives Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4043
On each line, write the plural form of the noun. 1. Three of the light ________________ didn’t work. switch 2. My dad brought home two _______________ as a surprise. puppy 3. In the two _____________ there were a total of ten _____________. flock goose 4. Seven ______________ were already waiting in the checkout line. person 5. Please pare the __________________. potato 6. Each of the five ______________ held three _________________. box flower 7. Four school ______________ were lined up at the curb. bus 8. My female just had six baby _______________! hamster 9. Our apartment manager doesn’t allow us to keep any _____________. pet 10. Terry was so hungry that he bought two ______________. lunch Spelling: Plurals & Possessives Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4043 ONE PINT ONE PINT
Homophones are words that are sound the same but are spelled differently. They also have different meanings. This makes them some of the most commonly misspelled words. The best way to figure out which homophone to use is to substitute another word that means the same thing. The computer has several problems, but the principal (main) one is damaged circuits. There are ten principles (rules) that apply to all forms of art. A school principal is your “pal.” Our principal (pal) is Mr. Adamson. to (toward) too (also) two (2) your (you own it) you’re (you are) sale (bargain) sail (huge canvas sheet on a boat) pair (two of a kind) pare (peel) pear (fruit) cent (penny) scent (odor) sent (past tense of send) principal (head of the school) principal (main) principle (rule) Homophones Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4030
Circle the correct homophone to complete the sentence. 1. This bat is on _____________. sale OR sail 2. The teacher told Alan to go to see the _____________. principle OR principal 3. I love the _____________ of roses! cent OR scent OR sent 4. There was a _____________ on the shelf. pair OR pare OR pear 5. _____________ going to the ballgame at 2 p.m. today. You’re OR Your 6. The ship set _____________ yesterday. sale OR sail 7. Gina needs a new _____________ of shoes for track. pair OR pare OR pear 8. We’re going to Florida that week, _____________. to OR too OR two 9. Corn is the _____________ grain grown in the area. principle OR principal Homophones Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4030
1/2 MOVIE DIRECTOR DATE SCENE TAKE Many English words come from other languages, especially Greek and Latin. Roots are Greek and Latin words that form the basis of many English words. Examples action, activity, actress, react, transact, actor audible, audience, audition, auditorium, audiovisual, auditory biology, autobiography, biopsy, antibiotic fraction, fracking, fracture, refraction (breaking light ray) biography, photography, autograph illuminate, lumens, luminous, luminescent, luminary manual labor, manipulate, manufacturer, manuscript naval, navigate, navy pedal, pedestrian, pedestal, biped phobic, claustrophobia, hydrophobia, xenophobia, arachnophobia import, export, portable, porter, transport, portage Root act aud bio frac graph lum man nav ped phob port spec Means do hear life break write light hand ship foot fear carry see inspection, spectacle, bespectacled, perspective, spectral, spectators Roots Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4056
These words have a Greek or Latin root. Draw a line to match each word to its definition. Use your knowledge of roots instead of a dictionary. A. a person’s life story written by the person himself B. a person who carries another’s luggage C. a famous, successful person D. fear of closed or small spaces E. a person who watches an event F. the part of the world in which life can exist G. a clever or skillful movement H. a large device that makes nuclear energy I. injection of water into rock at high pressure to release natural gas J. to travel around the world by ship or plane K. able to be heard L. an insect-like creature that is long, thin, and has many legs 1. reactor 2. audible 3. maneuver 4. circumnavigate 5. autobiography 6. fracking 7. claustrophobic 8. luminary 9. centipede 10. biosphere 11. spectator 12. porter Roots Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4056
A prefix is added to the start of a word to change its meaning. Prefix anti- against antiwar, antislavery, antisocial antibiotic contra- against contraband, contradict, contrary, contraindicated contrast dis- opposite disagree, disarm, discontinue, dishonest disintegrate post- after postdated, postpone, postwar, posthumous postscript P.S. I Love You quad- four quart, quarter, quadrant, quadruplets quadrilateral trans- across transatlantic, translate, transfer transcribe Means Examples A suffix is added to the endof a word to change its meaning. Suffix -ess female who duchess, empress, hostess, actress, lioness waitress -ical relating to chemical, comical, surgical, economical, quizzical identical -cian one who works clinician, magician, pediatrician, electrician musician -ish turns a word into an adjective boyish, reddish, selfish, ticklish, stylish sluggish -ly resembling carefully, friendly, happily, ordinarily, warmly angrily -ology the study of astrology, psychology, technology, zoology geology Means Examples Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4057 Prefixes & Suffixes
Circle the prefix or suffix of each word. Some words have both a prefix and a suffix. Write what the word means on the line. You may use a dictionary if necessary. Use the word in a sentence. 1. politician = ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 2. amatuerish = _____________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 3. contradiction = ___________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 4. transportable = ___________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 5. disregard = ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 6. critical = ________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 7. postnasal = ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 8. anti-inflammatory = ________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 9. mythology = _____________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 10 . goddess = _____________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4057 Prefixes & Suffixes
Spelling patterns are groups of letters that are common to many words. Here are some that commonly cause spelling problems: A noun that ends in f changes the f to v and adds es to show the plural. one knife but two knives one half but two halves one wife but three wives A noun that ends in f often has a related verb that ends in ve. The police looked for proof. The judge felt the evidence proves his guilt. (noun) (verb) We enjoy life to the fullest! They live just down the street. (noun) (verb) She holds Buddhist beliefs. She believes in the Buddha’s teachings. (noun) (verb) The letters oi and oy create the vowel sound oi as in oil. The man was annoyed by the noise. Our family rejoiced when we adopted the bunny from the shelter. Her employer told her she’d get a raise. Some words begin with silent letters; these just have to be memorized. silent g: gnarled, gnashing, gnats, gnawed, gnome silent k: knitting, knoll, kneel, knob, knowledgeable, knuckles silent w: wrap, wrath, wrongful, write, wren, wreak, wrestle, wrinkle one hoof but four hooves Spelling Patterns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4058
_____ 9. As a result of the storm, two people lost their lifes. _____ 5. A wrinkly rat nawed on the poison. Correct the misspelled word in each sentence. You can use a dictionary if you need to. If the sentence is correct as it stands, write NC for no change. _____ 1. Please put three knifes on the table. _____ 2. I ate three oisters at the picnic. _____ 3. A coywolf is a cross between a coyote and a wolf. _____ 4. He knelt to put the garden nome in his front yard. _____ 7. We will boicott the company until it pays its employees better. _____ 6. The police officer told the teens to stop loytering in the mall. _____ 8. The knowledgeable doctor wrapped her wrist in a bandage. _____ 11. Six wives were busy embroidering. _____ 10. She turned the nob, opened the door, and saw the boys. _____ 12. Do you belief in ghosts? _____ 13. You were wrong to rite such a mean note! _____ 14. The fox scratched at its gnat bites. Spelling Patterns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4058
Homonyms are words that sound the same. However, they are spelled differently and mean different things. Odd Animal Plurals You add an s to make the plural of most nouns. However, some animal nouns are strange. Their plural and singular forms are the same. You just have to memorize these few oddball plurals: one bison...two bison one deer...three deer desert (v): to leave; to abandon If a soldier tried to desert from Hitler’s army, he was shot. desert (n): a dry land with sparse vegetation and almost no rainfall Rodney was afraid of getting lost in the desert. dessert (n): a sweet food eaten after a meal’s main course The waiter asked, “Would you like dessert this evening?” rain (n): water falling from clouds We had three inches of rain yesterday. reign (n): period of time during which a monarch is the ruler of a nation King George IV’s reign lasted 10 years. rein (v): to control; also (n): the strap used to guide a horse Nan pulled on the reins to make the horse slow down. whose (adj): used often in questions to ask about ownership; also used to show which person one is talking about Whose cat is that? Gerald whispered to the woman whose car is yellow. who’s (contraction of who is): use only when you can substitute who is Who’s driving that van? one sheep...four sheep one shrimp...five shrimp any kind of fish: 3 trout, 6 salmon one moose...two moose Spelling Homonyms & Odd Plurals Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4065 RES 251
9. Have you ever looked at this web (cite, sight, site)? Underline the homonym that accurately completes the sentence. 1. (Whose, Who’s) going to run the garage sale this weekend? 3. Did you read about the (rain, reign, rein) of Queen Elizabeth I ? 2. The surgery should restore the blind man’s (cite, sight, site). 4. Earth’s driest (desert, dessert) is actually Antarctica. 5. You need to (rain, reign, rein) in the amount of time you spend in front of a screen. 6. I wish this (rain, reign, rein) would end; I want to go swimming. 10. The queen’s (rain, reign, rein) did not last long. 11. This book belongs to the man (whose, who’s) coat is hanging there. 12. Promise you won’t (desert, dessert) me in the wilderness! 7. Her favorite (desert, dessert) is cherry pie with ice cream. 8. (Whose, Who’s) hammer is this? Spelling Homonyms & Odd Plurals Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4065
STOP Here are some rules to help you spell words correctly. Write i before e except right after c or when it sounds like a as in neighbor and weigh: briefly beige conceive friendship This rule works most of the time; however, there are exceptions such as glacier, deity, either, and foreign. In a compound noun, add an s to the the most important part of the word to form the plural: 1 passerby, 2 passersby 1 brother-in-law, 2 brothers-in-law Nouns that end in a consonant y change to ie when adding the s to make the word plural: 1 country, 2 countries 1 penny, 2 pennies 1 fly, 2 flies This rule also works for verbs ending in