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Flip Charts

Our Solar System Flip Chart Set

Earth Science - Middle School

 
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\|xiFFIFGy00528qzZ Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com 34-6829 Our SOLAR SYSTEM Our SOLAR SYSTEM Charts Charts Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2014 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Student Activity Guide Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to summarize key concepts and assess their understanding. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of science curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the Activity Guide. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Formation of Our Solar System Geocentric & Heliocentric Models Parts of Our Solar System The Sun Measuring Distances in Space The Inner Planets The Outer Planets Comets, Asteroids & Meteors Pluto & the Kuiper Belt Vocabulary
Formation of Our Solar System Photos courtesy of NASA. Nebulae Solar systems begin in dusty gas clouds called nebulae that are found between stars. The dust is composed of elements like iron and carbon. Nebula gases include hydrogen and helium. Planetesimals Within a nebula, dust particles collide and stick together to form larger particles. This process is called accretion. The particles grow from pebbles, to rocks, to boulders. The larger particles are called planetesimals. Rocky & Gaseous Plan et Formation Rocky planetesimals near the Sun grew by accretion to become the rocky planets—Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. In the colder outer parts of the solar system, frozen gases accreted to rocky cores to form the gas giant planets—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4576 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Horsehead Nebula planetesimal dust
Pause and Review Create a concept map to describe the formation of the solar system. Formation of Our Solar System © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4576 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Formation of Our Solar System composed of formed by formed by formed by
Geocentric & Heliocentric Sy stems Geocentric Universe Concept Before the invention of the telescope, the solar system was described in relation to the Earth. In 140 AD, the Greek astronomer Ptolemy believed that the Earth was the center of the universe, and the Sun and planets revolved around the Earth. This is the geocentric concept of the universe. Heliocentric Universe Concept In 1543 Copernicus published a theory about the universe. He claimed that the Sun is the center of the universe and all the known planets revolved around the Sun. This is the heliocentric concept of the universe. A Heliocentric Solar System Today we know that the Sun is the center of our solar system a collection of planets orbiting a single star, the Sun. Ptolemaic/geocentric model Copernican/heliocentric model © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4577 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Sun Mercury Venus Earth Saturn Uranus Jupiter Neptune Mars
Pause and Review Complete the concept map to show the development of solar system models. Geocentric & Heliocentric Sy stems © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4577 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Geocentric & Heliocentric Mo dels describe describe describe
Parts of Our Solar System Photos courtesy of NASA. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4578 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Our solar system is within the Milky Way galaxy, which is within a universe of galaxies. Parts of Our Solar System Our solar system includes the Sun, eight planets, the moons of each planet and other objects that revolve around the Sun. The four rocky planets closest to the Sun are known as the inner planets, and the four gaseous planets in the outer solar system are called the outer planets. The relative size of the inner planets is much smaller than the outer planets. Milky Way Galaxy Universe of Galaxies Pluto (dwarf planet)
Pause and Review Complete this graphic organizer by putting the correct terms in the corresponding oval. Also write one fact about each item. List; moons, gas giants, Earth, Mars, Saturn, Mercury, Venus, Sun, asteroids, Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, Milky Way galaxy, planets, terrestrial planets . Parts of Our Solar System © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4578 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. UNIVERSE OUR SOLAR SYSTEM Inner Planets or _______________ Outer Planets or _______________ Complete this graphic organizer by putting the correct terms in the corresponding oval. Also give one fact about each item. List: moons, milky way galaxy, Sun, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Earth, Neptune, Uranus, Jupiter, Saturn, Asteroids, Planetesimals, Dwarf Planets, terrestrial planets, gas giants Our Solar System
The Sun Photos courtesy of NASA. Structure of the Sun The Sun is a massive burning ball of gases held together by gravity. It is primarily composed of helium and hydrogen gases. The Sun has three main layers—the core, the radiative zone and the convective zone. The Sun’s atmosphere is made up of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona. Sunspots are cooler, darker areas of gas on the Sun’s surface. Solar Flares Solar flares are enormous areas of extreme temperature on the Sun’s surface, caused by magnetic fields. They typically occur near sunspots. The Photosphere The photosphere is the inner layer of the Sun’s atmosphere. This gaseous layer is thick enough to be visible. When we look at the Sun, we are seeing the photosphere. The Chromosphere Just beyond the photosphere is a thin layer called the chromosphere, which has a reddish color. The chromosphere can be seen during a total solar eclipse when the Moon covers the Sun. The Sun’s Corona The outer atmosphere of the Sun is called the corona. It is composed of gases and extends for millions of kilometers beyond the Sun. The corona can only be seen during a total solar eclipse. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4579 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. The Core & Nuclear Fusion The core at the center of the Sun produces the Sun’s heat. This energy is produced by hydrogen nuclear fusion reactions. The Radiative Zone Energy produced in the Sun’s core is carried to the Sun’s surface in the form of light energy called photons. This energy moves from the core into a very dense radiative zone. The Convective Zone The outer layer of the Sun is called the convective zone. Hot gases in this layer rise toward the surface, where they become cooler and denser. The gases then descend back into the Sun. This circulating movement is called convection, and is similar to currents in the Earth’s mantle. core solar eclipse corona chromosphere convection currents photosphere chromosphere flare
Pause and Review Label the structures of the Sun. The Sun Describe each structure. 1. _______________________________________________________________________ 2. _______________________________________________________________________ 3. _______________________________________________________________________ 4. _______________________________________________________________________ 5. _______________________________________________________________________ 6. _______________________________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4579 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4580 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Measuring Distances in Space Photos courtesy of NASA. Astronomical Units The distance between the Earth and the Sun is approximately 150 million kilometers, or one astronomical unit (AU). Scientists use astronomical units to measure and describe distances in space. Another measurement is called a light-minute, which is the distance light travels in one minute, or approximately 18 million kilometers. Distance Between Planets and the Sun The dimensions of our solar system are vast. The four inner planets are much closer to the Sun than the four outer planets. There are numerous orbiting comets found beyond the planets in the outer solar system. Sun Earth
Pause and Review This overview gives you an idea of the great distance between the planets! Measuring Distances in Space 5 0101520253035404550556065707580859095 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135 140 145 150 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 200 205 210 215 220 225 230 240 245 250 255 235 Use the closer views below to measure each planet’s distance from the Sun in light minutes. Use the information on the front of this chart to complete the data table. 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 200 205 210 215 220 225 230 240 245 250 255 235 5 0101520253035404550556065707580859095 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135 140 145 150 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 200 205 210 215 220 225 230 240 245 250 255 235 © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4580 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Inner Planets Outer Planets Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Distance from the Sun Distance from the Sun Size (km) Size (km) Sun Sun Mercury Mercury Venus Venus Earth Earth Mars Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune DAWN JUNO CASSINI NEW HORIZONS DAWN JUNO NEW HORIZONS Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Light Minutes Light Minutes Light Minutes
The Inner Planets What Are the Inner Planets? The four planets closest to the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars, are grouped together as the inner planets. They have rocky surfaces, and are often called the terrestrial planets. These planets are small and closely spaced, as compared to the outer planets. Diameter (km) Distance from sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 4,880 km 58,000,000 km 59 88 0 Diameter (km) Distance from sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 12,100 km 108,000,000 km 243 225 0 retrograde rotation Mercury Mercury is the smallest planet, located closest to the Sun. It revolves on its axis very slowly. A single Mercury day is about 59 Earth days long. Mercury does not have any moons or atmosphere. Its surface is covered with craters. A magnetic field suggests that it has an iron core. Mars Mars, the fourth planet from the Sun, has two moons. A day on Mars is slightly longer than a day on Earth. Mars has a very thin atmosphere composed primarily of carbon dioxide. The surface is cold, dry, and dusty, with frozen ice caps found at its poles. Landforms and NASA rover samples indicate that there were once large amounts of liquid water on the surface of Mars. It has a volcanic history, and the largest volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons, is found there. Earth Earth is the third planet from the Sun. Earth’s distance from the Sun allows for moderate temperatures that keep most surface water in liquid form. The presence of liquid water and an oxygen-rich atmosphere make Earth suitable for millions of living organisms. Diameter (km) Distance from sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 12,742 km 150,000,000 km 1 365 1/4 1 Diameter (km) Distance from Sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 6,780 km 228,000,000 km 1.03 687 2 polar ice cap Olympus Mons Venus Venus is the second closest planet to the Sun. It is often called Earth’s sister or twin planet due to similar composition, gravity and size. Venus rotates very slowly in a clockwise direction, called retrograde rotation. Venus does not have any moons. Venus is surrounded by a very dense atmosphere. Due to the greenhouse effect, it has the hottest surface temperature of any planet. The air pressure on Venus is 92 times that on Earth. Craters and active volcanoes cover the surface of the planet. From a geologic perspective, Venus is considered a young planet. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4581 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of NASA, USFWS & NOAA. inner planets Mercury Venus Earth Mars
Pause and Review Fill in the table below with information about the four inner planets. The Inner Planets Distance from Sun Rotation Planet Revolution # of Moons Atmosphere/ Surface Mercury Venus Mars Earth © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4581 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
The Outer Planets some of Saturn’s moons What are the Outer Planets? The outer planets beyond Mars are the gas giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. They are also known as the Jovian planets. These planets are much larger and spaced further apart than the inner planets. They are primarily composed of hydrogen and helium. Jupiter Jupiter, the fifth planet from the Sun, is the largest planet in the solar system. Although primarily composed of gases, its magnetic field indicates that it may have a rocky core. It has a giant red spot that is actually an enormous storm in its atmosphere. There are 64 known moons that orbit Jupiter. Diameter (km) Distance from Sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 139,822 778,000,000 km .41 4,333 64 red spot Diameter (km) Distance from Sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 116,464 km 1,427,000,000 km .44 10,756 62 ice particles, dust & ro cks Saturn Saturn, the sixth planet from the Sun, is the second largest planet in the solar system. Winds can blow as fast as 1,800 km on this planet. Saturn’s rings are primarily composed of ice particles, with some dust and rock particles mixed in. There are 62 known moons that orbit Saturn. Uranus Uranus, the seventh planet from the Sun, was the first planet to be discovered with the use of a telescope. Its cloudy atmosphere is primarily made of helium and hydrogen. Uranus is sometimes referred to as an ice giant. This planet has two sets of rings and 27 known orbiting moons. Similar to Venus, Uranus spins on its axis in a clockwise direction, called retrograde rotation. It also has a rotation axis that is tilted almost parallel to its orbital plane. This makes it appear that Uranus is rotating on its side. Diameter (km) Distance from Sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 50,724 km 2,870,000,000 km .72 30,687 27 Diameter (km) Distance from Sun (average) Rotation (Earth Days) Revolution (Earth Days) Number of moons 49,244 km 4,498,000,000 km .67 60,190 13 Neptune Neptune is the furthest planet from the Sun. This gas giant is similar to Uranus in that it has a higher amount of frozen gases, like methane, water and ammonia, and therefore it is also called an ice giant. The highest known wind speeds in the solar system, measuring up to 2,100 kilometers per hour, are found on Neptune. Thirteen moons orbit Neptune. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4582 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of NASA. outer planets Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune
Pause and Review Fill in the table below with information about the four outer planets. Distance from Sun Rotation Planet Revolution # of Moons Atmosphere/ Surface Saturn Jupiter Uranus Neptune The Outer Planets © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4582 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Comets, Asteroids & Meteors Photos courtesy of NASA. Comets A comet is a small body composed of rock and ice that orbits the Sun. A comet’s tail of ice particles can stretch for millions of kilometers behind it. Comets originate in the outer regions of the solar system and have a wide range of orbital periods, up to a thousand years long. Scientists have identified thousands of comets, but this is just a fraction of the total number that exist. Asteroids Asteroids are irregularly shaped, rocky bodies that circle the Sun. They are found mostly in an area between Mars and Jupiter called the asteroid belt. Asteroids range in size from quite small to 100 kilometers in diameter. There are over 500,000 known asteroids. asteroid belt Jupiter Mars Meteoroids Meteoroids are smaller pieces of rock that have originated from asteroids. A streak of light called a meteor is seen when a meteroid enters and burns in the Earth’s atmosphere. When a meteoroid strikes Earth, it is called a meteorite. Meteor Crater in Arizona shows the impact and size of a meteorite collision. meteoroid meteor meteorite Earth’s atmosphere asteroids meteoroids Arizona meteor crater © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4582 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Pause and Review Label the image. Then, explain the difference between meteors , meteoroids and meteorites . Comets, Asteroids & Meteors © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4582 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Earth’s atmosphere _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________
Some images courtesy of NASA, ESA & STScl. Pluto and the Kuiper Belt Up until 2006, Pluto was considered the ninth planet from the Sun. After intensive studies, a group of international astronomers concluded that Pluto was actually a dwarf planet in a region called the Kuiper Belt. Asteroids and other planetesimals are found in this far distant region of our solar system. The Kuiper Belt is a disc-shaped region of icy objects beyond the planets, extending from the orbit of Neptune to billions of kilometers from our Sun. It is similar to the asteroid belt but it is far larger. Pluto and Eris are the best known of these icy worlds. There may be hundreds more of these ice dwarfs out there. The Kuiper Belt and the even more distant Oort cloud are believed to be the home of comets that orbit our Sun. Pluto Pluto and its moons Kuiper belt Pluto & th e Kuiper Belt © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4584 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Charon
Why is Pluto no longer considered a planet? _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Pause and Review Label the parts of our solar system; Earth, Mars, Saturn, Mercury, Pluto, Venus, Sun, Asteroid belt, Uranus, Jupiter, Pluto, Kuiper belt . Pluto & th e Kuiper Belt © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4584 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Key Vocabulary Terms © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4585 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of NASA. accretion the process by which dust particles collide, stick together and form larger particles asteroid a rocky body that circles the Sun in an area between Mars and Jupiter astronomical unit the average distance from the Sun to Earth, approximately 150,000,000 kilometers chromosphere the middle layer of the Sun’s atmosphere comet a small body composed of rock, dust and ice, that orbits the Sun; it has a long tail of ice particles convective zone the Sun’s layer near its surface in which hot gases rise, cool and then descend back into the Sun corona the Sun’s outer atmosphere that extends for millions of kilometers beyond the Sun gas giants the four outer planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus & Neptune) that ar e composed predominantly of hydrogen & helium meteoroid a small rocky body that orbits the Sun, originating from an asteroid photosphere the surface of the Sun that we are able to see radiative zone the inner layer of the Sun between the Sun’s core and the convective zone solar flare enormous “storms” of fire on the Sun’s surface caused by the Sun’s magnetic field sunspot dark, cooler areas on the Sun’s surface that result from the Sun’s magnetic field affecting the convection of heat terrestrial planets the four rocky inner planets closest to the Sun; Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars
Key Vocabulary Terms Mapping a Term Define it! Use it in a sentence! Draw it! Provide examples! ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4585 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Term __________________________________________________________
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