Curriculum Resources
Take learning to the next level and transform the way you teach with a vast library of ready-to-use, standards-aligned, adaptable curriculum resources. The resources listed below are either available with an Online Learning Subscription which allows you to instruct, assess and track student performance or as individual hands-on classroom resources which can be purchased. Choose from Multimedia Lessons, Curriculum Mastery Games, Flip Charts, Visual Learning Guides, Flash Cards, Vocabulary Cards, and Curriculum Modules available on our online store.
  • Select By Standard
  • BROWSE CURRICULUM
    • General Science
    • Life Science / Biology
    • Human Body
    • Earth Science
    • Physical Science
    • Chemistry
    • Math
    • Language Arts
    • Social Studies
 

Back
FREE Trial to
Online Learning
Shop for printed
Flip Charts

Exploring Nature: Food Chains & Food Webs

Life Science - Middle School

 
1
/
22
Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts 34-6305 \|xiBAHBDy01408pzY Exploring Nature Exploring Nature Food Chains & Food Chains & Food webs Food Webs Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more! From Sheri Amsel, Award Winning Naturalist, Author & Illustrator!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2011 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on the reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with black-line masters of the charts for students to fill-in, key vocabulary terms, corresponding quiz questions for each chart, along with answers Ideal for Learning centers In-class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand-alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to fill in the call-outs of key structures and summarize key concepts. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. On the reverse side of each black-line master are questions corresponding to each Flip Chart topic which can be used as further review or as a means of assessment. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade-appropriate curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Food Webs & Tr ophic Levels Coral Reef Food Web North American Desert Food Web Deciduous Forest Food Web Amazon Rainforest Food Web Lake and Pond Food Web African Savannah Food Web Polar Region Food Web Northern Boreal Forest Food Web Saltwater Marsh Food Web Exploring Nature E Exploring xploring Nature ature
Energy flows through an ecosystem as the animals eat plants or other animals in a complex food web. The source of all energy comes from the green plants which change sunlight into food through the process of photosynthesis. Some energy is lost each time an animal eats. Energy is lost as heat, as the predator uses its muscles to chase its prey (and often doesn’t even catch it). Energy is lost because not all of the prey can be digested and some material is passed as waste. Some energy is used for growth and reproduction, while some is simply used to fuel the animal’s everyday activities. This means that one lynx has to eat a lot of snowshoe hares to maintain its energy, reproduce and grow. Every snowshoe hare must eat a lot of grass and plants to maintain its energy, reproduce and grow. Because there is energy lost at each level of the food chain, it takes a lot of plants to feed one large predator found at the end of the food chain. Each part of this food chain is a trophic level and has a name. The plants that make their own food, using water, sunlight and carbon dioxide (photosynthesis), are called producers. The animals (insects, mice, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, deer, etc.) that eat the plants are primary consumers. If they eat only plants, they are called herbivores. The animals (spiders, birds, snakes, weasels, etc.) that eat the primary consumers are the secondary consumers. If they eat both plants and meat, they are called omnivores. If they eat only meat, they are called carnivores. The animals (fox, coyotes, eagles, owls, hawks, etc.) that eat the secondary consumers are tertiary consumers. The living things that eat and recycle dead animals and plants are called the decomposers or detritivores. These include insects, bacteria, mushrooms and other fungi. At each trophic level, energy is lost as heat. Food Webs & Trophic Levels Solar energy from the Sun Producers (1st Trophic Level) Primary Consumers (2nd Trophic Level) Herbivores Secondary Consumers (3rd Trophic Level) Carnivores Tertiary Consumers (4th Trophic Level) Carnivores Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat vole short-tailed weasel barred owl green plants Decomposers or Detritivores insects, bacteria & fungi
vole short-tailed weasel Solar energy from the Sun Producers (1st Trophic Level) Tertiary Consumers (4th Trophic Level) Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat Heat barred owl green plants Decomposers or Detritivores insects, bacteria & fungi Secondary Consumers (3rd Trophic Level) Primary Consumers (2nd Trophic Level) 94-4051 Food Webs & Trophic Levels __________________ flows through an ecosystem as the animals eat plants or other animals in a complex _________________ ____________. The source of all energy comes from the green plants which change sunlight into food through the process of _____________________________. Some energy is lost each time an animal eats. Energy is lost as _____________, as the predator uses its muscles to chase its prey (and often doesn’t even catch it). Energy is lost because not all of the prey can be digested, and some material is passed as waste. Some energy is used for growth and reproduction, while some is simply used to fuel the animal’s everyday activities. This means that one lynx has to eat a lot of snowshoe hares to maintain its energy, reproduce and grow. Every snowshoe hare must eat a lot of grass and plants to maintain its energy, reproduce and grow. Because there is energy lost at each level of the food chain, it takes a lot of plants to feed one large predator at the end of the food chain. Each part of this food chain is a _________________ level and has a name. The plants that make their own food, using water, sunlight and carbon dioxide (photosynthesis), are called _____________________. The animals (insects, mice, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, deer, etc.) that eat the plants are _____________________ consumers. If they eat only plants, they are called __________________. The animals (spiders, birds, snakes, weasels, etc.) that eat the primary consumers are the ____________________ consumers. If they eat both plants and meat, they are called _____________________. If they eat only meat, they are called ___________________. The animals (fox, coyotes, eagles, owls, hawks, etc.) that eat the secondary consumers are ___________________ consumers. The living things that eat and recycle dead animals and plants are called the ____________________ or ____________________. These include insects, bacteria, mushrooms and other fungi.
Amazon Rainforest food web Producers 1. brazil nut (tree) 2. jackfruit (tree) 3. avocado (tree) 4. banana (tree) 5. cecropia tree 6. fuschia flower Primary Consumers 7. agouti 8. morpho butterfly 9. birdwing butterfly 10. macaw 11. three-toed sloth 12. tapir 13. calliope hummingbird 14. toucan Secondary Consumers 15. harpy eagle 16. jaguar 17. boa constrictor 18. squirrel monkey 19. golden lion tamarin 20. spider monkey Decomposers 21. bacteria 22. fungi 4 1 2 3 5 17 16 8 6 17 11 14 7 19 9 12 15 13 20 18 21 22 10 Amsel
94-4052 Amazon Rainforest food web 13 12 Secondary Consumers 13. __________________ __________________ 14. __________________ 15. __________________ 16. __________________ __________________ 17. __________________ __________________ 18. __________________ __________________ Decomposers 19. bacteria 20. fungi Producers 1. _____________________ 2. _____________________ 3. _____________________ 4. _____________________ 5. _____________________ Primary Consumers 6. _____________________ 7. _____________________ 8. _____________________ 9. _____________________ 10. _____________________ 11. _____________________ 12. _____________________ 4 1 2 3 5 15 7 10 6 17 8 11 18 16 19 20 9 Amsel 14
North American Desert Food Web Producers 1. yucca cactus 2. brittlebush 3. prickly pear Primary Consumers 4. jackrabbit 5. cactus mouse 6. beetle 7. desert tortoise 8. grasshopper 9. poorwill 10. chuckwalla 11. kangaroo rat 12. Gambel’s quail Secondary Consumers 13. fringed lizard 14. roadrunner 15. kit fox 16. elf owl 17. red-tailed hawk 18. turkey vulture 19. scorpion 20. rattlesnake Decomposers 21. bacteria 22. fungi Amsel 4 2 5 8 17 6 13 14 7 10 11 15 12 19 9 16 18 20 21 22 1 3
94-4053 Amsel North American Desert Food Web Producers 1. ________________________ 2. ________________________ 3. ________________________ Primary Consumers 4. ________________________ 5. ________________________ 6. ________________________ 7. ________________________ 8. ________________________ 9. ________________________ 10. ________________________ 11. ________________________ 12. ________________________ Secondary Consumers 13. ________________________ 14. ________________________ 15. ________________________ 16. ________________________ 17. ________________________ 18. ________________________ 19. ________________________ 20. ________________________ Decomposers 21. ________________________ 22. ________________________ 4 2 5 8 17 6 13 14 7 10 11 15 12 19 9 16 18 20 21 22 1 3
Polar Region food web Producers 1. grass 2. phytoplankton 3. lichen Primary Consumers 4. arctic hare 5. dall sheep 6. lemming 7. musk ox 8. caribou 9. snow goose 10. ptarmigan 11. clam Secondary Consumers 12. arctic grayling 13. arctic tern 14. puffin 15. weasel 16. arctic fox 17. arctic wolf 18. walrus 19. narwhal 20. beluga whale 21. killer whale 22. fur seal 23. harp seal 24. polar bear 25. sockeye salmon Decomposers 26. bacteria 27. fungi 4 1 23 5 8 9 6 7 10 25 12 19 18 17 16 15 14 21 22 24 23 20 Amsel 13 13 3 3 2 11 26 27
94-4054 15 Producers 1. ___________________________ 2. ___________________________ 3. ___________________________ Primary Consumers 4. ___________________________ 5. ___________________________ 6. ___________________________ 7. ___________________________ 8. ___________________________ 9. ___________________________ 10. ___________________________ 11. ___________________________ Secondary Consumers 12. ___________________________ 13. ___________________________ 14. ___________________________ 15. ___________________________ 16. ___________________________ 17. ___________________________ 18. ___________________________ 19. ___________________________ 20. ___________________________ 21. ___________________________ 22. ___________________________ 23. ___________________________ 24. ___________________________ 25. __________________________ Decomposers 26. __________________________ 27. __________________________ 4 1 3 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 12 19 18 17 16 14 21 22 24 23 20 Amsel 13 2 25 11 26 27 Polar Region food web 23
Amsel 4 5 8 6 11 14 7 12 15 13 19 9 18 20 21 22 10 19 16 4 3 3 16 17 1 Coral Reef Food Web Producers 1. plankton Primary Consumers 2. blue striped snapper 3. angelfish 4. jackfish 5. sea urchin 6. shrimp 7. sea fan 8. clown fish 9. coral 10. sea sponge Secondary Consumers 11. blue shark 12. stingray 13. jellyfish 14. starfish 15. sea turtle 16. sea anemone 17. pufferfish 18. sea snake 19. octopus 20. bottlenose dolphin 21. moray eel 22. sea slug 2
94-4055 Producers 1. _________________________ Primary Consumers 2. _________________________ 3. _________________________ 4. _________________________ 5. _________________________ 6. _________________________ 7. _________________________ 8. _________________________ 9. _________________________ 10. _________________________ Secondary Consumers 11. _________________________ 12. _________________________ 13. _________________________ 14. _________________________ 15. _________________________ 16. _________________________ 17. _________________________ 18. _________________________ 19. _________________________ 20. _________________________ 21. _________________________ 22. _________________________ Amsel 4 5 8 6 11 14 7 12 15 13 19 9 18 20 21 22 10 19 16 4 3 3 16 17 1 2 Coral Reef Food Web
African Savannah food web Producers 1. grass 2. acacia tree 3. baobob tree Primary Consumers 4. ostrich 5. zebra 6. Thompson’s gazelle 7. wildebeest 8. grasshopper 9. giraffe 10. elephant Secondary Consumers 11. lion 12. cheetah 13. secretary bird 14. harrier eagle Decomposers 15. bacteria 16. fungi 17. dung beetle Amsel 6 2 7 1 5 4 3 8 9 11 10 13 12 15 14 17 16
Amsel Producers 1. ___________________________ 2. ___________________________ 3. ___________________________ Primary Consumers 4. ___________________________ 5. ___________________________ 6. ___________________________ 7. ___________________________ 8. ___________________________ 9. ___________________________ 10. ___________________________ Secondary Consumers 11. ___________________________ 12. ___________________________ 13. ___________________________ 14. ___________________________ Decomposers 15. ___________________________ 16. ___________________________ 17. ___________________________ 6 2 7 1 5 4 3 8 9 11 10 13 12 15 14 17 16 94-4056 African Savannah food web
Northern Boreal Forest food web Producers 1. grass 2. balsam fir 3. willow 4. jack pine 5. white spruce 6. white cedar 7. tamarack 8. plants and shrubs Primary Consumers 9. moose 10. crossbill 11. red squirrel 12. blue jay 13. vole 14. snowshoe hare Secondary Consumers 15. great gray owl 16. wolf 17. mink 18. lynx 19. fisher Decomposers 20. bacteria 21. fungus 4 1 3 8 9 6 7 10 11 12 19 18 17 16 15 14 21 13 20 5 2 2 Amsel 13 1
94-4057 4 1 3 8 9 6 7 10 11 12 19 18 17 16 15 14 21 13 20 5 2 2 Amsel 13 1 Producers 1. _________________________ 2. _________________________ 3. _________________________ 4. _________________________ 5. _________________________ 6. _________________________ 7. _________________________ 8. _________________________ _________________________ Primary Consumers 9. _________________________ 10. _________________________ 11. _________________________ 12. _________________________ 13. _________________________ 14. _________________________ Secondary Consumers 15. _________________________ 16. _________________________ 17. _________________________ 18. _________________________ 19. _________________________ Decomposers 20. bacteria 21. fungus Northern Boreal Forest food web
Deciduous Forest food web Producers 1. maple tree 2. oak tree 3. beech tree 4. serviceberry Primary Consumers 5. woodland vole 6. red squirrel 7. white-tailed deer 8. wood-boring beetle Secondary Consumers 9. garter snake 10. long-tailed weasel 11. pileated woodpecker 12. barred owl 13. golden-crowned kinglet 14. ground beetle 15. red eft (newt) 16. wood frog Decomposers 17. bacteria 18. fungi Amsel 4 1 2 3 5 8 17 6 11 14 7 10 12 15 13 18 9 16 18
94-4058 Deciduous Forest food web Amsel Producers 1. _________________________ 2. _________________________ 3. _________________________ 4. _________________________ Primary Consumers 5. _________________________ 6. _________________________ 7. _________________________ 8. _________________________ Secondary Consumers 9. _________________________ 10. _________________________ 11. _________________________ 12. _________________________ 13. _________________________ 14. _________________________ 15. _________________________ 16. _________________________ Decomposers 17. _________________________ 18. _________________________ 4 2 5 8 17 6 11 14 7 10 12 15 13 18 9 16 18 1 3
Saltwater Marsh food web Producers 1. cordgrass 2. sea oats 3. phytoplankton Primary Consumers 4. bobolink 5. clams 6. mummichog 7. grass shrimp 8. snail Secondary Consumers 9. great blue heron 10. striped bass 11. snowy egret 12. osprey 13. northern harrier 14. herring gull 15. raccoon 16. horseshoe crab 17. green heron 18. green crab Decomposers 19. bacteria 20. fungus 4 1 2 5 8 17 6 11 7 10 12 15 13 19 9 16 20 18 3 14 Amsel
94-4059 Amsel 4 1 2 5 8 17 6 11 7 10 12 15 13 19 9 16 20 18 3 14 Producers 1. _______________________ 2. _______________________ 3. _______________________ Primary Consumers 4. _______________________ 5. _______________________ 6. _______________________ 7. _______________________ 8. _______________________ _______________________ Secondary Consumers 9. _______________________ 10. _______________________ 11. _______________________ 12. _______________________ 13. _______________________ 14. _______________________ 15. _______________________ 16. _______________________ 17. _______________________ 18. _______________________ Decomposers 19. bacteria 20. fungus Saltwater Marsh food web
Producers 1. cattails 2. pond lilies 3. blueberries 4. phytoplankton 5. trees Primary Consumers 6. water boatman 7. muskrat 8. beaver 9. painted turtle 10. mallard duck Secondary Consumers 11. great blue heron 12. giant water bug 13. bullfrog 14. trout and perch (fish) 15. snapping turtle 16. merganser 17. otter 18. dragonfly 19. osprey 20. loon 21. raccoon Detritivores 22. crayfish 23. clams 24. invertebrate larvae Decomposers 25. bacteria 26. fungi dead and decomposing matter Amsel 4 1 2 3 5 8 17 6 11 14 14 7 10 12 15 13 18 19 9 16 20 21 26 25 24 23 22 Lake and Pond food web
94-4060 dead and decomposing matter Amsel 4 1 2 3 5 8 17 6 11 14 14 7 10 12 15 13 18 19 9 16 20 21 26 25 24 23 22 Producers 1. __________________________ 2. __________________________ 3. __________________________ 4. __________________________ 5. __________________________ Primary Consumers 6. __________________________ 7. __________________________ 8. __________________________ 9. __________________________ 10. __________________________ Secondary Consumers 11. __________________________ 12. __________________________ 13. __________________________ 14. __________________________ 15. __________________________ 16. __________________________ 17. __________________________ 18. __________________________ 19. __________________________ 20. __________________________ 21. __________________________ Detritivores 22. __________________________ 23. __________________________ 24. __________________________ Decomposers 25. bacteria 26. fungi Lake and Pond food web
© Copyright 2012-2017 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Notice * Terms of Use